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Calories Burned During Sex May Surprise You

21/06/2018 jleff 0

When it comes to breaking a sweat, a romp in bed is likely the most enjoyable way to do so. And if you’re doing it a few times a week (or a day), you’re getting more of a workout. It gets your heart rate up while burning a few calories.

Not to mention that all that bumping and grinding is great for your relationship and happiness. Sex has been shown to help your body fight disease and boost your health and mood. It will also help you get a good night’s sleep since it boosts serotonin, the feel-good chemical in your body. Read more about the benefits of sex.

Still, if you’re looking to slim down, you might not want to give up that Stairmaster just yet. Unfortunately, intercourse may not burn as many calories as you think (though sex may be a more enjoyable calorie burner than a Pilates class).

A study from the University of Montreal compared the calorie expenditure of running to that of sex. It found that running outpaced sex, not surprisingly. Women burned about 213 calories during 30 minutes of light running and men burned 276. Men burned 101 calories during 25 minutes of sex and women only 69, burning an average of 3.6 calories per minute.

So why did guys have a better burn? Researchers think that since men often weigh more than women, they use more energy for doing the same exercise. Men may also be more physically active during sex.

It’s also worth knowing that sex sessions in the study lasted an average of 25 minutes (including foreplay). That’s far longer than average. Times varied in the study, ranging from 10 to 57 minutes. The longer the session, the more calories burned. One study in the New England Journal of Medicine found that most sex sessions last six minutes (not including foreplay).

You can take measures to hike the calorie count of your time getting it on, but you can’t really count on sex to reach your weight-loss goals. Remember that the number of calories you burn during sex varies from one romp to another. So, if you’re sweating and breathing hard, you’ve likely burned more.

Here are some tips for burning more calories during sex:

  • Make some moans and sighs to burn some extra calories.

  • Change your position to make it more of a workout, especially women. If you’re on top, move your hips like a belly dancer. It will feel good while giving you a workout.

  • Experiment with a position where you squat on top of your partner and then bounce up and down. That’s a great way to work out your thighs and rear.

  • Try being on top rather than on the bottom, because research suggests that requires more energy.

  • Kiss in unusual positions. Have the guy on his back. Do a push up on top of him. Come down to kiss him and then push back up.

  • Take off your clothes in ways that burn calories. Draw it out and make it part of your foreplay. Or tease him as you get undressed. Do a seductive dance with a silk scarf, for example.

  • Get inspired by Dirty Dancing. Do some romantic moves, adding in some kissing, touching and neck nibbling.

  • Give a good massage to get your heart rate up. Ramp things up by going deeper. It’s more sensual and works different muscles. Take turns so you can both get the calorie burn and its arousing impact.

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Testing for Herpes: What You Need to Know

20/06/2018 jleff 0

If you or someone you care about is concerned that they may have genital herpes, then you know that it can be a very worrisome time with a long list of questions. What makes it even more difficult is that you might be hearing conflicting and confusing information.

Testing for herpes when symptoms are present

If there are visible or active symptoms, such as sores, small bumps, crusted lesions or small skin tears, then a health care provider can swab the area and send it out for a PCR (polymerase chain reaction) evaluation. This is the most accurate way to test because it looks for the viral DNA, which is present even after a few days of symptoms. We don’t use cultures anymore because they are not as reliable.

When symptoms are not present

If a person does not have any symptoms and wants to know if they have been exposed to the virus and become infected, then the best test to ask for is a HerpeSelect blood test. This is a type specific glycoprotein (g) test that is highly accurate. We do not test IgG or IgM anymore without the type specific testing because there are too many false positives.

Learn more about How to Deal With Your Partner’s Herpes.

Can a person find out when they were infected?

This question comes up frequently, but because of the time it takes to develop symptoms and to get a definitive diagnosis, it can be difficult to pinpoint the time of infection.

  • The time it takes to develop symptoms of a herpes infection after contact: Symptoms typically start within 3 to 7 days of being exposed.

  • The time it takes for the body to develop blood antibodies to the herpes virus: Antibody formation takes 6 to 12 weeks after infection.

That means that with a new infection:

  • The PCR test will be positive; the HerpeSelect will be negative.

When someone has had the virus for longer than 12 weeks:

  • The PCR test will be positive and the HerpeSelect will be positive.

Read more:
Help! My Partner Has Herpes
Is It a Cold Sore? Or Is It Herpes?
Oral Herpes 101

This blog originally appeared on Nurse Barb’s Daily Dose. Barb Dehn is a women’s health nurse practitioner, award-winning author and nationally recognized health expert. She practices with Women Physicians in the Silicon Valley of California.

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Small Self-Care Steps That Will Make a Big Difference

20/06/2018 jleff 0

Taking care of yourself isn’t selfish or self-indulgent. Focusing on your own health and well-being will lower your stress, not add to it. Taking small steps now will make a big difference in helping you take care of yourself and your family without sacrificing the pride you’ve earned.

Know what can wait
Managing your health and your family’s is non-negotiable. So, leave the dishes in the sink. Let the laundry pile up from time to time. Practicing self-care will give you more energy to deal with everything else that you have going on. Read more about self-care tips that won’t break the bank.

Listen to some relaxing tunes
It can be classical, jazz or whatever genre soothes you. Music contributes to a healthy mind and body by lifting your mood, improving your concentration and promoting relaxation. Find out why we all need to practice self-care.

Learn how to say no
It’s OK to say no to something or delegate to someone else. Oftentimes, you’re being asked because someone else said no. You can do that, too. So, say no to a playdate for one of your kids, an invitation to be on a school committee or a birthday party. The crew won’t ditch you if you skip one happy hour. You’ll feel more in control and confident.

But say yes to help
When a friend offers to do after-school activity carpool for you, say yes. When your partner says takeout for dinner is fine, put that defrosted chicken back in the fridge. When a colleague offers to clean up a presentation at 4 p.m. because you have seven other deadlines, say YES. Accepting help doesn’t mean you’re weak. It means you’re strong enough to put yourself first.

Make a call
When was the last time you made a phone call to someone instead of texting them? Buzz your mom, dad or best friend just to say hello. It will boost the well-being of both of you.

Find your “flow”
Work-life balance—it’s all anyone wants to talk about, but that conversation needs to change. Is it about finding your balance? Or rather your flow? Look at it as being able to find the best way to manage one aspect of your life after another, at any given time, rather than trying to balance everything out.

Get up 10 to 15 minutes earlier
It might seem difficult at first. But the extra free time in your day will likely feel like a luxury. Use the minutes to read or sit in peace. Avoid looking at your phone until the time is up. Learn 3 Ways to Get Your Day Off to a Good Start.

Find a health care professional that works for you
Find a health care professional you can see regularly for day-to-day problems and who can help coordinate your care with specialists when needed. You might consider sharing a family doctor with your kids. That makes it simpler to treat a household virus or keep an eye on that heart condition you passed down to your daughter. Even if you keep your own health care provider, schedule your wellness exam when you book your kids’ checkups. When choosing a provider, scope out some basic policies: whether it’s possible to get a same-day visit, how long patients usually have to wait for a routine checkup and whether you can make those appointments and access your records online.

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The Stigma of Type 1 Diabetes

20/06/2018 jleff 0

TUESDAY, June 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Michael Wright was just 16 when he was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, and although his friends supported him, he always felt different.

READ: 3 Types of Diabetes

“I would do my injections and testing in p…

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Tips for a Better Massage

19/06/2018 jleff 0
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Stress, anxiety, aches, pains and muscle tension: they’re all facts of life.

And all good reasons to get a massage.

Learn more about Is Your Everyday Life Setting You Up for Pain?

It’s great to be able to give yourself a massage at home and equally nice to go out for one. Either way, it’s a treat. And because a massage can be such an integral tool to better health, you’ll want to get the most of it.

Making the most of your massage is easy to do with one of the many at-home massagers from Wahl, like this Hot/Cold Therapy Massager. Right in your own hands you have the ability to choose the temperature and the pressure you’d like. There’s a powerful, variable-speed motor and seven therapeutic attachments, including heating and cooling plates to give you complete and customized relief. 

Things might not be quite as much under your control when you go out for a professional massage—but there are tips for making it better. After all, there’s nothing worse than paying for a mediocre massage.

A massage is too good of a thing to waste. Here’s how to get the best rubdown ever.

1. Know the various techniques when you book your appointment.

  • Swedish massage is gentle and uses a variety of strokes including long strokes, deep circular movements, kneading, tapping and vibration. Its goal is to energize and relax.

  • Deep massage (sometimes called deep tissue massage) targets the deep layers of muscles and connective tissue. It’s commonly used to help relieve muscle tension and/or damage from injuries. The strokes are slower and more forceful.

  • Sports massage uses similar techniques to Swedish and can help prevent or treat injuries from sports activities. It might also include trigger point massage, which focuses on especially tight muscle fibers.

2. Give yourself time to relax ahead of time.

Sprinting into your massage with seconds to spare and lying down on the table with a racing pulse is not the best way to start. Arrive early. If the facility has showers, saunas or steam rooms, take advantage of their power to help you relax. This way, when you are ready to lie down on the table, you are putty in the hands of the expert.

3. Speak up.

Many massage therapists will ask about injuries or your medical history before leaving the room for you to disrobe, but they often don’t ask other questions. Take the opportunity to add some details. Do you like gentle or firm pressure? A slow or a fast-paced massage? Feel free to ask the therapist to concentrate on certain body parts, too, like your feet, scalp, shoulders, hands or wherever else you’d like more attention. Don’t expect them to read your mind. And if the force they’re using is too heavy or light, let them know—they won’t be offended.

4. Think about timing.

There’s no magic hour to schedule a massage, but it’s good to think about how it fits into your day. For instance, if you are a pile of mush after your massage, schedule it for the end of the day when you don’t have any responsibilities and can let the relaxation last straight through to bedtime. On the other hand, if a massage invigorates and energizes you, consider it to be a great way to start your day.

5. Watch your food and drink intake.

A full bladder or belly can detract from the full benefits of a massage. You don’t want to feel bladder pressure or tummy rumblings during your time of bliss, after all. Eating lightly one or two hours before your massage will give your body time to digest properly. And save the heavy drinking (water or tea, of course) for after the massage, when it’s important to replenish your muscle tissues, which can become dehydrated during a massage.

6. Feel free to snooze.

Some people don’t want to sleep and miss a minute of the massage; others can doze off effortlessly and still reap the benefits. If you get a chatty masseuse and prefer quiet, feel free to say something like, “I’m just going to close my eyes and mellow out now,” or, “Wake me when it’s over!”

7. If you’re sore, don’t ignore.

Since your muscles are being worked during a massage, they can get sore, similar to how they can feel after a workout. If they do, apply ice or do some light stretching or yoga to ease the tenderness and keep everything in harmony.

Now, lie down, relax and be ready to say “ahhhhhh.”

This post originally appeared on mysocalledmidlife.net.

Read More:
5 Quick and Easy Tips for Keeping Your Sanity When You’re in Pain
Moms and Massage, a Perfect Marriage

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NPR It’s Your Health with Lisa Davis Interviews HealthyWomen CEO Beth Battaglino About Colon Cancer Screenings

19/06/2018 jleff 0

Listen to the interview here

MADISON, WI – A recent survey conducted by HealthyWomen, in collaboration with Exact Sciences, found that women 50 years and older ranked colon[1] cancer as the second-most concerning cancer type after breast cancer. The survey, which analyzed the behaviors of more than 1,000 women, found that although respondents identified colon cancer as a concern, a significant number of those surveyed indicated they had not yet followed recommended guidelines and been screened for colon cancer. Further, of those surveyed who had not been screened, 30 percent said they avoided colon cancer screening because they did not want to have a colonoscopy.

“Even though most women are aware that they should be getting screened for colon cancer, some just don’t want to deal with an invasive colonoscopy.” said HealthyWomen’s CEO and RN, Beth Battaglino. “This survey shows that there is a great need to go from awareness to actually getting the screening done, and the availability of other colon cancer screening options should be discussed and offered during conversations between women and their health care providers.”

The American Cancer Society estimates colon cancer will cause more than 23,000 deaths among women this year, making it the third leading cause of cancer deaths among women in the U.S.[i] Early detection is essential because when colon cancer is caught early, 90 percent of all cases are treatable.[ii] Increasing awareness of the different types of screening options available is necessary in order to increase the number of women getting screened for colon cancer.

While many people are familiar with colonoscopy, colon cancer screening guidelines include other options for women over the age of 50 who are at average risk.3 These include multitarget stool DNA test (Cologuard), fecal blood test, CT colonography (also known as a virtual colonoscopy) and sigmoidoscopy. Cologuard, a noninvasive screening test, is included on equal standing among the colon cancer screening options included in the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) guidelines.3

Additional highlights from the survey include:

• Of the women who said their health care providers recommended colon cancer screening, only 30 percent said their provider discussed more than one screening option.

• 48 percent of women surveyed had not heard of Cologuard but once told what it was, 63 percent said they would be very likely to use the test.

The American Cancer Society recommends colon cancer screening for men and women of average risk for developing colon cancer starting at age 50, in order to detect, and even prevent, colon cancer.[iii] Women are encouraged to talk to their health care providers to determine what colon screening option may work best. To get more information, women can visit www.new50.com, an educational resource made available by Exact Sciences that aims to encourage people 50 and older to talk with their health care provider about colon cancer screening, including the modern, noninvasive options that meet the needs of the current generation.

About HealthyWomen:

HealthyWomen is the nation’s leading independent, nonprofit health information source for women. Our mission is to educate and empower women to make informed health choices for themselves and for their families. For nearly 30 years, millions of women have turned to HealthyWomen for answers to their most personal health care questions. Consumers, health care providers, nonprofit and corporate partners and the media trust HealthyWomen as a valued and reliable health information source.

Nothing is more important to our health than access to competent care and the safety of our medications. HealthyWomen works to educate women about policy issues that may affect their health. We promote the importance of medical research and the need for women to participate in clinical trials to improve women’s health now and for future generations. We support the need for continued funding for medical research and research on sex differences. HealthyWomen collaborates with our many advocacy partners and to ensure that legislators make women’s health a primary focus. For more information, please visit HealthyWomen.org.

About Exact Sciences Corp. and Cologuard:

Exact Sciences Corp. is a leading molecular diagnostic company and the maker of Cologuard, a noninvasive screening test for people age 50 and older with average risk for colon cancer. Included among recommended colon cancer screening options by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force guidelines, Cologuard is the only FDA-approved test of its kind that uses advanced technology to detect changes in stool DNA that can indicate precancer and cancer.[iv],[v]

Cologuard was approved by the FDA in August 2014 and results from Exact Sciences’ prospective 90-site, point-in-time, 10,000-patient pivotal trial were published in the New England Journal of Medicine in March 2014. Cologuard is included in the American Cancer Society’s (2014) colorectal cancer screening guidelines and the recommendations of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (2016) and National Comprehensive Cancer Network (2016).

Cologuard is intended for the qualitative detection of colorectal neoplasia associated DNA markers and for the presence of occult hemoglobin in human stool. A positive result may indicate the presence of colorectal cancer (CRC) or advanced adenoma (AA) and should be followed by diagnostic colonoscopy.

Cologuard is indicated to screen adults of either sex, 50 years or older, who are at typical average-risk for CRC. Cologuard is not for everyone; not for high risk individuals, including those with a family history of colorectal cancer, a personal history of colorectal cancer or advanced adenoma, IBD and certain hereditary syndromes. Positive Cologuard results should be referred to diagnostic colonoscopy. A negative Cologuard test result does not guarantee absence of cancer or advanced adenoma. Following a negative result, patients should continue participating in a screening program at an interval and with a method appropriate for the individual patient. Cologuard performance when used for repeat testing has not been evaluated or established. Rx only.

For more information on Exact Sciences, please visit the company’s website at www.exactsciences.com, follow Exact Sciences on Twitter @ExactSciences or find Exact Sciences on Facebook.

Tuesday, June 19, 2018
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In The Ladies Room With Dr. Donnica Interviews HealthyWomen CEO Beth Battaglino–Take Your Butt To The Doctor: New Advances in Colon Cancer Screening

18/06/2018 jleff 0

On the June 7, 2018 segment of In The Ladies Room with Dr. Donnica, Dr. Donnica Moore featured HealthyWomen’s CEO and RN, Beth Battaglino, who has the distinct honor of being the first guest of the podcast to have a 2nd episode! In this segment, Beth discusses a recent survey done with Exact Sciences to learn about women’s attitudes toward cancer screenings and how many women are skipping routine screenings for colorectal cancer. Although women ranked colorectal cancer as the second cancer they are most worried about, over 1/3 of women surveyed are skipping their screenings. Colon cancer is the 3rd leading cause of cancer deaths and 90% of colorectal cases are treatable when caught early. Beth and Dr. Donnica Moore discuss the importance of early detection and the many options that are available for colon cancer screenings.

Thursday, June 7, 2018
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Warning Labels Can Scare Folks Away From Sugary Drinks

18/06/2018 jleff 0

TUESDAY, June 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) — People are less likely to buy sugary drinks if they see warning labels that include graphic pictures of health consequences such as obesity, diabetes and tooth decay, researchers report.

READ: Reasons to Fea…

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Get Out—Together!

13/06/2018 jleff 0

Summer has finally arrived, along with the opportunity (and energy) for different kinds of date nights. My date night strategy in the summer is driven by the climate where I live: Summer is a short season, but the days themselves are blissfully lon…

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The Healthy Father’s Day Gift Guide

12/06/2018 jleff 0
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Father’s Day gives us all an opportunity to celebrate the men in our lives. And since we, as women, outlive men and usually adopt the role as gatekeepers for our families’ health, it’s the perfect opportunity to take gift giving one step further.

Here are some ways to celebrate the health of the men in your life, emphasizing all five senses. A gift-giving bonus: Learning to use the five senses can help them better tune in to the amazing things the body can do and better understand its health, physical activity and nutrition needs.

Taste

OK, it might be a one-in-a-million shot that he can look or perform like Super Bowl MVP Tom Brady, but it is possible for him to eat like Brady, who has partnered with the vegan meal kit company Purple Carrot to create TB12 Performance plant-based dinners. Good for the body as well as the planet, these high-protein, gluten-free and easy-to-prepare kits feed two and are delivered right to your door. You might enjoy feeling like his gorgeous wife Gisele as you dine together on healthy meals complete with things like sweet potato gnocchi with escarole followed by creamy avocado ice cream. Take a look here for a choice of Performance meals.

Learn more about The Most Popular Meal Delivery Services.

Sight

If you find your man narrowing his eyes too often, it may be eyestrain, not anger. Yet, many men scoff at carrying bulky reading glasses or don’t want to be bothered. ThinOptics glasses, born in Silicon Valley, are small and light, yet powerful enough to help him see clearly. They come in a variety of ingenious, easy-to-carry styles, ranging from keychains to phone cases. Take advantage of Thin Optic’s Father’s Day special, which is offering a 20 percent off on orders over $50, with free shipping on orders over $40.

Smell

As long as you’re playing Gisele and Tom, add another ingredient to the ambiance with this woodsy, smoky candle by Jo Malone. The benefits of aromatherapy are many: Scents have their own special way of enhancing mood and well-being and easing anxiety and stress.

Hearing

Being active is a huge step in the right direction toward better health. Listening to music while you work out can keep you moving. The right music lends a boost toward energizing a workout and improving performance (do you sense the Tom Brady reference here?). Music can take his mind off any pain or fatigue that his run, bike or weight lifting might render. Bring it on with these picks from JLab Audio, an award-winning designer of personal audio including headphones and Bluetooth speakers.

Touch

Your guy will never tire of the soft feel of these Fun Socks by Fun Company, a lifestyle brand of exciting products that encourages self-expression and, well, fun. With a classic, edgy vibe, the patterns will make him smile, especially the colorful ones created just for him—Hero Dad and King of the Castle are just a few. Take a look at their whole fun line here.

Taste

Celebrate his good taste with a unique gift co-curated by Josh Cellars and personal gift concierge, Giftagram. Each box features a bottle of Josh Cellar’s Paso Robles Cabernet Sauvignon and a curated selection of other gifts chosen especially for the wine-lover, travel aficionado or chef. And while he sips his wine, remind him of its health benefits: It may help him live longer, protect against certain cancers and improve and enhance his mental and heart health.

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Could You Have Rosacea?

12/06/2018 jleff 0

HealthDay News

TUESDAY, June 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Acne isn’t reserved for teens, and breakouts can persist into adulthood. But there’s another common skin condition — rosacea — that causes a different type of blemish, strikes in the adult years, and won’t respond to typical acne products.

The first telltale sign of rosacea is the tendency to blush or flush easily. You might notice redness across your nose and cheeks. The discoloration may extend to your forehead, chin and ears, as well as chest and back. Other signs are acne-like breakouts, thick and bumpy skin and, for some, red, irritated eyes.

READ: 5 Natural Remedies for Treating Rosacea

Here are some rosacea warning signs:

  • Passing or permanent redness on the cheeks, nose and beyond.
  • Small visible blood vessels on the surface of the face.
  • Bumps or pimples on the face.
  • Watery or irritated eyes and swollen eyelids.

Although the exact cause is unknown, rosacea tends to run in families and can be set off by triggers ranging from the sun and stress to wine and spicy foods. Many of the 16 million Americans living with rosacea are between 30 and 50 years old and have fair skin, blonde hair and blue eyes.

Unlike teen acne, which often clears up eventually, untreated rosacea can continue to worsen indefinitely. It also leads to varying degrees of distress and lifestyle restrictions from skipping certain foods to skipping social engagements out of embarrassment.

But there’s help available, so don’t ignore warning signs or put off seeing a dermatologist and getting treatment. Options include topical treatments, antibiotics and laser therapy to zap visible blood vessels. Also, work with your doctor to pinpoint your unique triggers so you can avoid them and limit flares.

Copyright © 2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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Coffee May Do Your Liver Good

11/06/2018 jleff 0

MONDAY, June 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) — More good news for coffee lovers: Having three or more cups of “joe” each day may help ward off serious liver ailments, new research suggests.

READ: Drink Up Coffee’s Health Perks

The 26-year study of more t…

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TRY IT: HealthyWomen’s New Cancer Clinical Trial Navigation Service

07/06/2018 jleff 0

Cancer clinical trials continue to be somewhat of a mystery to many people. Yet clinical trials are an important option to consider whenever you or a loved one is making a treatment decision for cancer.

To help provide some clarity and support your exploration of cancer clinical trial options, HealthyWomen is providing these must-know facts, along with details about HealthyWomen’s NEW Cancer Clinical Trial Navigation Service. Our Clinical Trial Navigators are available to help you connect with clinical trials looking for your or a loved one’s specific diagnosis, stage and treatment history.

Consider Clinical Trials at Each Treatment Decision Point

Despite what many people think, clinical trials are not only for people who have exhausted all treatment options.

Clinical trials are available for newly diagnosed patients as well as patients who have had multiple therapies and relapses. Knowing when and how to search is important—each treatment decision you make will render you eligible for some clinical trials and ineligible for others.

There are over 5,000 cancer clinical trials open today in the United States which include evaluations of 900 targeted and immunotherapies. The purpose, design and timing of cancer clinical trials vary widely, including:

  • Evaluating a new treatment to manage or cure a specific diagnosis

  • Finding ways to prevent a recurrence at key points in the journey

  • Evaluating ways to diagnose a condition or recurrence earlier

  • Looking for ways to improve the comfort and quality of life of people with a chronic illness and reduce side effects from existing treatments

Where to Find Appropriate Clinical Trials

Every clinical trial has specific inclusion and exclusion criteria to make sure that people joining have the same diagnosis and treatment history. HealthyWomen now offers a free, confidential Cancer Clinical Trial Navigation Service to help you identify clinical trials appropriate for you today. To use the Cancer Clinical Trial Navigation Service, sign up HERE, answer the short questionnaire, and we will match your answers to the eligibility criteria of every clinical trial in the country available for your diagnosis. If you have questions along the way, Clinical Trial Navigators are available to help.

Risks/Benefits of Clinical Trials

Participation in a clinical trial brings a host of potential risks and benefits. The benefits include access to new therapies in development otherwise unavailable, more frequent monitoring, and sometimes access to top medical care at elite facilities. Cancer clinical trials typically compare a new therapy to the existing standard of care (not a placebo alone) so participation means you are getting treatment. There is also some evidence suggesting that participants in phase III trials have better outcomes overall than those treated with standard care. But the risks of participation are real and should not be slighted. It is important to remember that participation in a clinical trial is voluntary; you never need to enroll, and you may choose to leave a clinical trial at any time.

There is almost always some risk when you participate in a clinical trial, because many are conducted for the express purpose of determining whether a new drug, device or procedure is safe. However, before clinical testing of a new drug is initiated, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration must examine lab and animal data to estimate the potential risk to humans. If risk is too high compared with the potential benefit, the agency will not allow the trial to begin.

Moreover, each trial site has an institutional review board that evaluates trial proposals for safety. Many trials also have a data safety and monitoring board or committee that reviews the data from time to time and will stop the trial if it finds evidence of safety problems. Such oversight does not eliminate risk, but it does ensure trials are conducted as safely as possible and monitored.

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Summer May Mean More Yeast Infections

06/06/2018 jleff 0

From Women’s Health Foundation
Much of the country is experiencing hot, sticky summer days. And with this kind of weather, it’s important to keep your downstairs ventilated. You see, a yucky side effect of hot summer days is yeast infections. Yeast jus…

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20 Things to Expect When You’re Expecting to Be the Groom’s Mother

06/06/2018 jleff 0

Well, it’s been quite a whirlwind.

My son Jonathan and now-wife Caroline’s wedding this past weekend seemingly snuck up on us, although the planning started a good 18 months ago. Until the date got really close, it didn’t seem like reality (at least not to me).

And then, it suddenly was.

Planning a wedding is a job in and of itself, but when it’s all done, it will no doubt leave you with a lifetime of warm and fuzzy feelings and beautiful memories.

I didn’t have a big wedding; it wasn’t exactly my thing (that, combined with family and financial situations which would have precluded it, even if I did want it). In spite of that, I’m so thrilled that this wedding took place and am still reveling in every wonderful, special moment of the celebration!

As the mother of the groom, my job was way different than that of the bride’s mother, who was intricately and intimately involved in each minute detail. But I was thrilled to be part of so much of the prep work: the hunt for the wedding gown, the bridal shower, updates on the planning progress, the night-before rehearsal dinner for out-of-town guests and the wedding party, and finally, the all-important wedding day preparations at my home with a makeup artist and hairstylist to make us all red-carpet-ready.

Here are some things I experienced along the way. If you are, or will be, a mother-of-the-groom, you may experience similar things:

  1. Family dinners will be dominated by “weddingspeak.” Sure, you might discuss current life, but that life will be mostly trivialities (not really trivial, but compared to the wedding, they become so).

  2. People will constantly ask, “Are you stressed?” You’ll wonder why they’re asking that. What’s there to be stressed about anyway?

  3. You’ll start to see your son differently, remembering the time you said to him, “I may be the most important woman in your life right now, but one day, your wife will take my place.” You’ll remember when he started acting like a lovely gentleman and pulling the chair out for you in restaurants and helping you on with your coat, and you’ll be pleased to see him doing that for his fiancée, too.

  4. As the date of the wedding nears, you’ll find yourself waking at 3 in the morning with your mind racing. Maybe you are stressed.

  5. When the wedding week finally arrives, not only is your sleep not what it should be, but neither is your appetite. And when you work out at the gym, you keep thinking, “I sure hope I don’t get hurt.”

  6. When people ask, “Are you stressed?” you’ll finally admit that you might be, yes.

  7. You’ll begin to feel increasingly distracted and anxious and wonder why. “Oh, right,” you’ll say. “The wedding—it’s in three days.” You’ll also feel very, very grateful for your daughter-in-law and for being alive to see your son get married. Because not every mother is.

  8. You get very weepy, thinking back to the little boy who is now an almost-married man, wondering how it’s possible that the years have passed so quickly since you last read him Goodnight Moon and watched him navigate kindergarten, play with his Legos, graduate middle school, go to the prom, apply to colleges, graduate, go to law school and get a very responsible job. You’ll realize that although he is indeed a man, complete with an almost-wife, he is still a child to you. You wonder if that will ever change.

  9. You’ll tell your son “I love you” more than you usually do—and hope that you’re not sounding too needy or desperate.

  10. The night before the wedding, your speech at the rehearsal dinner will go something like this: “Whoever said a woman should marry a man who loves his mother was right. How he treats his mother will tell you everything you need to know. You are marrying someone who will love and cherish you and treat you with respect and kindness always.” And you will grab a tissue to dab at your tears. Some people will imitate you.

  11. You’ll cry and hug some more, being careful not to smear your makeup on your son’s collar as you pull him to you tightly, thanking him for not only making you a mom, but for making you a mother-in-law, too.

  12. The morning of the wedding, you may get a call from your mom, telling you that she fell and is unable to come to the wedding. You’ll cry silently, mourning the fact that she is the last of your son’s grandparents and can’t be there. You’ll get another call from your sister telling you that your niece, who was in a car accident the day before, also can’t come. They will both be OK, but they will be missed.

  13. You realize once again that life is not only filled with celebrations and joys but sacrifices and tragedies as well. You must not let the last two get in the way of the first two.

  14. The wedding will be magical, and you’ll quickly realize what’s been keeping your son and his fiancée so busy and focused for so long.

  15. You will dance like a 20-something, but the next morning your arthritic knees will remind you that you’re really 60-something and maybe you should have sat one or two out.

  16. Your stress will almost disappear (but your sore knees will not), replaced by elation and happiness.

  17. As you pick up your cell phone the next day to check your texts, you’ll smile and finally exhale when you see one from your son, telling you that they have safely landed halfway across the world for their honeymoon.

  18. You realize that although some things do change—that your son is now a married man, far away celebrating his honeymoon—he is, indeed, still your child.

  19. This parenting thing never ends, and for that, you are grateful.

  20. You’ll start to feel stressed again about 15 days from now, waiting to get a text that their plane has safely touched down in New York.

This post originally appeared on mysocalledmidlife.net.

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What does the mother of the groom go through before, during and after the wedding? A roller coaster of emotions.
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What does the mother of the groom go through before, during and after the wedding? A roller coaster of emotions.
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20 Things to Expect When You’re Expecting to Be the Groom’s Mother

06/06/2018 jleff 0

Well, it’s been quite a whirlwind.

My son Jonathan and now-wife Caroline’s wedding this past weekend seemingly snuck up on us, although the planning started a good 18 months ago. Until the date got really close, it didn’t seem like reality (at least not to me).

And then, it suddenly was.

Planning a wedding is a job in and of itself, but when it’s all done, it will no doubt leave you with a lifetime of warm and fuzzy feelings and beautiful memories.

I didn’t have a big wedding; it wasn’t exactly my thing (that, combined with family and financial situations which would have precluded it, even if I did want it). In spite of that, I’m so thrilled that this wedding took place and am still reveling in every wonderful, special moment of the celebration!

As the mother of the groom, my job was way different than that of the bride’s mother, who was intricately and intimately involved in each minute detail. But I was thrilled to be part of so much of the prep work: the hunt for the wedding gown, the bridal shower, updates on the planning progress, the night-before rehearsal dinner for out-of-town guests and the wedding party, and finally, the all-important wedding day preparations at my home with a makeup artist and hairstylist to make us all red-carpet-ready.

Here are some things I experienced along the way. If you are, or will be, a mother-of-the-groom, you may experience similar things:

  1. Family dinners will be dominated by “weddingspeak.” Sure, you might discuss current life, but that life will be mostly trivialities (not really trivial, but compared to the wedding, they become so).

  2. People will constantly ask, “Are you stressed?” You’ll wonder why they’re asking that. What’s there to be stressed about anyway?

  3. You’ll start to see your son differently, remembering the time you said to him, “I may be the most important woman in your life right now, but one day, your wife will take my place.” You’ll remember when he started acting like a lovely gentleman and pulling the chair out for you in restaurants and helping you on with your coat, and you’ll be pleased to see him doing that for his fiancée, too.

  4. As the date of the wedding nears, you’ll find yourself waking at 3 in the morning with your mind racing. Maybe you are stressed.

  5. When the wedding week finally arrives, not only is your sleep not what it should be, but neither is your appetite. And when you work out at the gym, you keep thinking, “I sure hope I don’t get hurt.”

  6. When people ask, “Are you stressed?” you’ll finally admit that you might be, yes.

  7. You’ll begin to feel increasingly distracted and anxious and wonder why. “Oh, right,” you’ll say. “The wedding—it’s in three days.” You’ll also feel very, very grateful for your daughter-in-law and for being alive to see your son get married. Because not every mother is.

  8. You get very weepy, thinking back to the little boy who is now an almost-married man, wondering how it’s possible that the years have passed so quickly since you last read him Goodnight Moon and watched him navigate kindergarten, play with his Legos, graduate middle school, go to the prom, apply to colleges, graduate, go to law school and get a very responsible job. You’ll realize that although he is indeed a man, complete with an almost-wife, he is still a child to you. You wonder if that will ever change.

  9. You’ll tell your son “I love you” more than you usually do—and hope that you’re not sounding too needy or desperate.

  10. The night before the wedding, your speech at the rehearsal dinner will go something like this: “Whoever said a woman should marry a man who loves his mother was right. How he treats his mother will tell you everything you need to know. You are marrying someone who will love and cherish you and treat you with respect and kindness always.” And you will grab a tissue to dab at your tears. Some people will imitate you.

  11. You’ll cry and hug some more, being careful not to smear your makeup on your son’s collar as you pull him to you tightly, thanking him for not only making you a mom, but for making you a mother-in-law, too.

  12. The morning of the wedding, you may get a call from your mom, telling you that she fell and is unable to come to the wedding. You’ll cry silently, mourning the fact that she is the last of your son’s grandparents and can’t be there. You’ll get another call from your sister telling you that your niece, who was in a car accident the day before, also can’t come. They will both be OK, but they will be missed.

  13. You realize once again that life is not only filled with celebrations and joys but sacrifices and tragedies as well. You must not let the last two get in the way of the first two.

  14. The wedding will be magical, and you’ll quickly realize what’s been keeping your son and his fiancée so busy and focused for so long.

  15. You will dance like a 20-something, but the next morning your arthritic knees will remind you that you’re really 60-something and maybe you should have sat one or two out.

  16. Your stress will almost disappear (but your sore knees will not), replaced by elation and happiness.

  17. As you pick up your cell phone the next day to check your texts, you’ll smile and finally exhale when you see one from your son, telling you that they have safely landed halfway across the world for their honeymoon.

  18. You realize that although some things do change—that your son is now a married man, far away celebrating his honeymoon—he is, indeed, still your child.

  19. This parenting thing never ends, and for that, you are grateful.

  20. You’ll start to feel stressed again about 15 days from now, waiting to get a text that their plane has safely touched down in New York.

This post originally appeared on mysocalledmidlife.net.

Pull Quote: 
What does the mother of the groom go through before, during and after the wedding? A roller coaster of emotions.
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What does the mother of the groom go through before, during and after the wedding? A roller coaster of emotions.
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The Moment You Stop Dieting and Start Cooking Good Food

05/06/2018 jleff 0

By Judi Cutrone, From Women’s Health Foundation
If you’re very lucky, one day you’ll have an ah-ha moment when it comes to food. And it’ll blow all of those diet books, magazine articles, endless commercials and miracle drugs out of the water. …

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Non-Drug Migraine Treatments Often Ignored

05/06/2018 jleff 0

TUESDAY, June 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Many migraine sufferers skip recommended behavioral treatments, such as stress management and talk therapy, a new study finds.

READ: When It’s More Than Just a Bad Headache

Lack of time, cost and skepticism …