No Image

HealthyWomen, Allies to Congress: Ensure 55 Million U.S. Women Receive Continued Preventive Care

09/08/2018 jleff 0

Denying women access to care has life or death consequences

WASHINGTON—With the future of health care at stake, 55 million women could lose access to 26 critical preventive care services.

Under current law, health plans provide 26 preventive care services to women at no out-of-pocket expense. Gutting this coverage would deny millions from accessing critical health services, including gestational diabetes testing, HIV and HPV tests, Pap smears, mammograms, breastfeeding support and domestic violence screening.

The fight to “Keep the Care” has never been more important.

Women’s Access to Preventive Care is Not Just a Priority—but a Necessity

On July 20, HealthyWomen hosted a congressional briefing to drive home the consequences of Congress rolling back coverage requirements for women’s preventive health care services.

The event—a part of HealthyWomen’s Keep the Care nationwide advocacy campaign—convened panelists from HealthyWomenNational Hispanic Medical Association and the Black Women’s Health Imperative to address the current policy landscape and the threat to all women if preventive care is denied.

Among the briefing’s key takeaways:

Women are at higher risk for diseases and infections like breast cancer, heart disease and HPV:
Prevention is a fundamental aspect of what health care should cover because of what it does, how it works and how it leads to better health,” – Mike Miller, MD, HealthyWomen’s senior health policy advisor

  • Invasive breast cancer is diagnosed in >230,000 women a year
  • HPV infection occurs in >290,000 women
  • Heart disease kills 25% of women

More Latina women have access to health care today than ever before:
36 percent of Latinas were uninsured before the 2010 implementation of the ACA—but today, 8.8 million Latinas have preventive care. The ACA has been a game changer for Latinas,” – Elena Rios, MD, MSPH, FACP, president & CEO of the National Hispanic Medical Association

  • The Latina community experienced a 25% drop in those who delayed or rejected care due to cost

Preventive care matters for black women:
Without access to certain preventive services, we could lose 20,000-24,000 [black] women needlessly every year,” – Linda Goler Blount, MPH, president & CEO of the Black Women’s Health Imperative

  • Today, 4 million more black women are insured, and the uninsured rate has dropped 40%
  • The # of black women not reporting medical issues due to lack of insurance has dropped 20%

Preventive care saves the U.S. health care system billions of dollars:
Women’s preventive services more than pays for themselves in lower costs to the health system,” – Phyllis Greenberger, MSW, HealthyWomen’s senior vice president for science and health policy

  • $322 billion for pre-diabetes, diabetes
  • $16.5 billion for breast cancer
  • $5.9 billion for HIV/HPV
  • Up to $100,000 per patient for cervical cancer treatment

Keep the Care, an initiative launched in March 2017 by MSLGROUP and HealthyWomen, is a nationwide advocacy effort to demand that no-cost coverage of 26 women’s preventive healthcare services remain available to women.

“If ever there was an issue that fits the mission of Healthy Women, it’s preserving the 26 preventive care services that are now available under the Affordable Care Act,” Greenberger concluded.

For more information, please visit KeepTheCare.org.

Tuesday, July 25, 2017
Tags: 
Channel editor’s picks: 
Is channel featured: 
Show printer-friendly version and send by email buttons: 
No Image

HealthyWomen Urges Congressional Leaders to Protect Beneficiaries of Medicare Part D

09/08/2018 jleff 0

As the nation’s leading independent, nonprofit health information source for women, HealthyWomen is concerned about proposals and activities that can undermine the quality and value of health care for women. Therefore, we are concerned about the provision in the Senate budget bill that would undermine the structure and insurance benefit of the Medicare Part D program. Specifically, by restructuring the benefit so that Medicare Part D plans have no financial exposure in the coverage gap (a.k.a. donut hole), Part D plans would no longer have incentives to act as partners with Medicare beneficiaries – and fiduciary representatives – to ensure that patients are getting the most clinically and cost effective medicines at the best prices.

In health insurance discussions, the term “skin in the game” is often used to describe the situation where stakeholders have some financial interest in managing health care to provide the best value and outcomes for patients. Taking away the Part D plans’ “skin in the game” in the coverage gap undermines this concept and the important role Part D plans serve as effective negotiators on behalf of Medicare beneficiaries.

“Part D helps nearly 42 million Americans afford prescription drugs by fostering private negotiations that reduce drug costs. If passed, the new provision – that has not been discussed in hearings or recommended by MedPAC – would undermine the negotiation process and hurt older adults and the disabled who rely on Medicare Part D. Thus, we urge Congress to discard this provision, and continue to maintain a patient-centered approach for Medicare’s coverage and benefits in Part D and in the entire Medicare program,” says Beth Battaglino, RN, CEO, HealthyWomen.

Thursday, February 8, 2018
Tags: 
Channel editor’s picks: 
Is channel featured: 
Show printer-friendly version and send by email buttons: 
No Image

Congress: Keep the REMS Safety Program Intact

07/08/2018 jleff 0

Today, approximately 140,000 adults are diagnosed with ADPKD (autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease), a painful and life-threatening inherited disease that eventually leads to kidney failure. In fact, more than half of those with ADPKP will deve…

No Image

Treating IBS-D as an Imbalance of Gut Bacteria

07/08/2018 jleff 0

Salix Pharmaceuticals sponsored this post. However, all opinions are my own.

Irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea (IBS-D) is a condition that affects more than 16 million Americans and is characterized by chronic abdominal pain and changes i…

No Image

The Truth About Watermelon

06/08/2018 jleff 0
Attachment Size
Image icon The Wonderful Truth About Watermelon 901.09 KB

When you think of summer and picnics, do you think of watermelon?

How could you not? It’s sweet, refreshing and juicy and practically spells summer. Watermelon, a cousin to squash, cucumbers and pumpkins, comes in five main types: seedless, seeded, mini (or personal, which have thinner rinds), yellow and orange.

But watermelon adds up to more than just water and sweetness. During its growth, which takes about 90 days, it’s busy producing lots of nutrients—substantial amounts of vitamin A, for healthy skin and eyes; vitamin B6 for immune function and brain development in pregnancy and infancy; and vitamin C, which can boost immunity.

And that’s not all: This nutrient-dense fruit contains more lycopene than any other fresh fruit or veggie, a powerful antioxidant which gives it its red color and may aid in sun protection. It also contains an abundance of other antioxidants and amino acids, which help your body function optimally by helping to maintain blood flow. There’s potassium and a low amount of sodium, too.

If you’re watching your weight, you can indulge guilt-free. A cup will only set you back 40 calories. And because over 90 percent of this melon is water, it’s super-hydrating. An average 15- to 20-pound watermelon will yield about six cups of juice and 11 cups of fruit.

Watermelon makes a great snack. It’s easy to slice or dice and toss in a container. And here’s a tidbit you might not know: you can use the entire watermelon (even the rind), which is edible and sometimes used as a vegetable that can be stir-fried, stewed or even pickled.

If you’ve waited too long to use it and your melon is overripe, don’t toss it. Instead, juice or puree it and still reap the nutritional benefits. And after you scrape the rind clean, you can use it as a compostable bowl filled with fruit salad. If it’s a big watermelon, it can hold a lot—but it might not be as big as the one recorded in the Guinness World Records, which weighed in at 350.5 pounds.

Wondering how to pick a perfect melon? Carefully look it over to see that it’s firm and symmetrical and free from bruises, dents or cuts. When you lift it, it should be heavy for its size. Check the underside. There should be a creamy, yellow spot from where it sat on the ground and ripened. Most melons, from the time they’re cut from the vine, have a shelf life of about three to four weeks.

Research points to the benefits of increasing consumption of plant foods to help decrease the risk of obesity, diabetes, heart disease and overall mortality. We say watermelon should be on the top of everyone’s list!

Pull Quote: 
Watermelon is a perfect summer food: refreshing, nutritious, hydrating and delicious. It also has antioxidants to help protect your cells from damage. And that’s not all!
womenTALK Blog Topics: 
field_vote: 
Select ratingGive The Truth About Watermelon 1/5Give The Truth About Watermelon 2/5Give The Truth About Watermelon 3/5Give The Truth About Watermelon 4/5Give The Truth About Watermelon 5/5

No votes yet
Long Description: 
No Image

What I Want You to Know About Living with Endometriosis

02/08/2018 jleff 0

By Jen O’Neill This post is part of HealthyWomen’s Real Women, Real Stories series. “Periods hurt. You get cramps. That’s normal.” “Have you tried pain medication?” “You should just have a kid!” “Just hold out for menopause.” My first period c…

No Image

What I Want You to Know About Living with Endometriosis

02/08/2018 jleff 0

By Jen O’Neill This post is part of HealthyWomen’s Real Women, Real Stories series. “Periods hurt. You get cramps. That’s normal.” “Have you tried pain medication?” “You should just have a kid!” “Just hold out for menopause.” My first period c…

No Image

What I Want You to Know About Living with Endometriosis

02/08/2018 jleff 0

By Jen O’Neill This post is part of HealthyWomen’s Real Women, Real Stories series. “Periods hurt. You get cramps. That’s normal.” “Have you tried pain medication?” “You should just have a kid!” “Just hold out for menopause.” My first period c…

No Image

Time-saving Hacks for the Busy Woman

02/08/2018 jleff 0

Just about everyone claims to be busy. “Sorry, I’ve been swamped.” “I’ve just been so busy.” “I haven’t had a chance to breathe.” However, maybe we aren’t actually “that” busy. We’re using every second of every hour in our lives whether it be sle…

No Image

How to Meditate Without Really Trying

01/08/2018 jleff 0
Attachment Size
Image icon How to Meditate Without Really Trying 1.53 MB

Try as I might, I just can’t manage to meditate.

It’s not for lack of trying. I’ve taken classes, talked to avid meditators hoping to get some tips, read countless articles, listened to podcasts and watched instructional videos—you name it.

But that magic Zen moment I’m hoping for never really kicks in. Once, at a class at Canyon Ranch in Arizona, I thought I was successfully meditating but realized afterward I had instead fallen asleep. (The nap was refreshing, sure; but it wasn’t what I had hoped to achieve.)

Here’s the thing: The harder I try to meditate, the more elusive it gets.

Learn about Meditation Tricks for Busy Bodies.

Despite knowing all the wonderful health benefits of meditating—especially some that I can really use right now because, lately, the world feels like it’s spinning out of control—this is one health practice that slips right through my nimble fingers. But something akin to an “aha moment” occurred to me the other day when I found myself in my backyard, staring at my bird feeder. I realized that I had, indeed, been meditating all along. Let me explain.

Last week, I refilled the empty feeder. At various times throughout the following days, I glanced at it from my kitchen window, each time disappointed that it stood unnoticed. But on this particular day, there was action—lots of it. Birds of different sizes and colors fluttered busily around it.

When the action died down a bit, I became especially mesmerized by a very small, bright yellow bird, the type I’ve only seen in a cage in a pet store or while vacationing in more exotic locales (but certainly not around my part of Connecticut).

Wishing to capture the tiny beauty with a photo, I stopped what I was doing, grabbed my phone and rushed outside,  tiptoeing slowly and silently toward the feeder. I stopped just short of it, not daring to breathe lest the bird fly away, waiting for the perfect moment to release the shutter. As I waited, I watched, absorbed in the quick and jerky movements of the bird, silently commanding it to stay put long enough for me to capture the moment.

In case you’re wondering, I didn’t get the shot. The yellow bird abruptly flew away, giving up his space for a different bird, this time red. Granted, it wasn’t as brightly colored but it was photo-worthy, nonetheless.

Anyhow, when I walked back inside and glanced at the clock, I was shocked to discover that almost an hour had passed. If you had asked me how long I was out there, I would have told you it was only five, maybe 10 minutes. Once inside, I had a different feeling than before I left—I felt lighter, more clear-headed, happier.

That’s meditating, after all. It’s the ability to be present, to be in the here and now, fully engaged in whatever you’re doing at that very moment.

All along, I was doing all those things that you do when you meditate: observing without judging, thinking, reflecting, studying, examining, considering.

And don’t we all do these things every day, perhaps even multiple times each day? We do—we just don’t consciously realize it.

Read about The Perfect Morning: 3 Ways to Get Your Day Off to a Good Start.

Since then, I’ve counted at least five other ways I’ve been meditating in my everyday life without trying. I meditate when I:

  • Walk or sit  on the beach and stare out at the water.

  • Eat and focus on my food, the way I’m chewing, its taste and texture.

  • Take a shower and listen to the sound of the water hitting my body or the shower floor.

  • Ride my bicycle and become aware of the recurrent circular motion of my legs.

  • Sit still and do … nothing.

Meditating is all about awareness and focus and letting everything outside your immediate world melt away.

What are some ways you are meditating, without meditating?

This post originally appeared on mysocalledmidlife.net.

Pull Quote: 
Meditating doesn’t require a special time or place. You can meditate without really trying by being fully engaged in the present moment.
womenTALK Blog Topics: 
field_vote: 
Select ratingGive How to Meditate Without Really Trying 1/5Give How to Meditate Without Really Trying 2/5Give How to Meditate Without Really Trying 3/5Give How to Meditate Without Really Trying 4/5Give How to Meditate Without Really Trying 5/5

No votes yet
Long Description: 
No Image

Blood-Thinning Medication and Reversal Treatment Facts

01/08/2018 jleff 0

If you have patients taking blood-thinning medications to reduce stroke risk associated with atrial fibrillation (AFib), it’s important to educate them on reversal treatments in the case of an emergency.Download and print this PDF for distribution to y…

No Image

Living Well With AFib

31/07/2018 jleff 0

If you are diagnosed with atrial fibrillation (AFib), an irregular and often rapid heart rate that occurs when the two upper chambers of your heart (atria) experience chaotic electrical signals, management is incredibly important. Those who have A…

No Image

Science-Based Diet Tips That Really Work

26/07/2018 jleff 0

HealthDay News

THURSDAY, July 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) — There’s no shortage of good diet advice, but the following tips have scientific research to support them.

For starters, take the advice to never go shopping hungry one step further by eating a piece of fruit before you go. Researchers found this encouraged people to buy 25 percent more produce.

READ: Best Foods for Weight Loss

It’s always a good idea to limit snacking while watching TV, so never eat right out of the bag. This is even more important advice to heed when you’re caught up in the action of a program: The more distracting the show or movie, the less aware you are of how much you’re eating.

Most people know that it takes diet and exercise to lose weight. But a three-part approach may be even better. Staying in contact with a diet coach, just by phone, helped dieters in one study maintain a 10 percent weight loss.

Another study found that first learning maintenance skills for healthy eating — before any attempt to diet — led to greater weight loss success.

Here’s how to get smarter about weight loss before dieting:

  • Learn about energy balance: calories in versus calories out.
  • Learn about healthy portion sizes and how to be more active.
  • Get in the habit of weighing yourself daily to monitor fluctuations and recognize regain.
  • Make small but frequent lifestyle tweaks and practice more good-for-you habits.
  • Develop a plan to deal with diet disruptions like restaurant buffets and holiday parties.

You might also do better on a diet that takes into account your unique needs. For instance, decide whether you would benefit more from a weight loss program that helps you work through an unhealthy relationship with food and improves a negative body image. Or one that emphasizes environmental changes, showing you how to improve the quality of your diet and boost physical fitness and your motivation level.

Pick and choose from all these successful techniques to find the right formula for you.

Copyright © 2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Promotion Slots: 
Short Description: 
There’s no shortage of good diet advice, but these tips have scientific research to support them.
field_vote: 
Select ratingGive Science-Based Diet Tips That Really Work 1/5Give Science-Based Diet Tips That Really Work 2/5Give Science-Based Diet Tips That Really Work 3/5Give Science-Based Diet Tips That Really Work 4/5Give Science-Based Diet Tips That Really Work 5/5
Long Description: 
There’s no shortage of good diet advice, but these tips have scientific research to support them.
Show printer-friendly version and send by email buttons: 
No Image

Another Treatment for HSDD May Be Coming Soon!

25/07/2018 jleff 0

A few years ago, I shared that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) had approved flibanserin, the first available treatment for women experiencing hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD), low sexual desire that can’t be attributed to external circumstances like medical conditions or relationship difficulties. I said then that it made me optimistic that additional treatments would be developed.

I’m happy to say that my optimism wasn’t unfounded. The FDA is reviewing another treatment for HSSD called bremalanotide, which is self-administered through a disposable auto-injector. While it’s not a “pink Viagra,” it is designed to be used right before a sexual encounter, rather than on a daily basis, like the tablet flibanserin. HSDD results from an imbalance in chemicals, and bremalanotide works by changing the balance between “inhibitory and excitatory neural pathways in the brain,” according to its maker, AMAG Pharmaceuticals.

It could be approved early in 2019, and that would be good news for the estimated 6 million pre-menopausal women who have HSDD—about one in 10 (and for postmenopausal women, too, but the study didn’t include them). As with flibanserin, sold under the brand name Addyi, this new drug is likely to be explicitly approved for the population included in the study. Most of those women likely don’t realize that what they are experiencing has a name, and that it’s now treatable. Instead, they may believe they have to accept low libido as part of “middle age.”

Learn more about sex after menopause.

It’s true that it’s normal for desire and sex drive to fluctuate. Each of us decides what’s right for us and our partners. But if what you thought was a passing dip in desire lasts for longer than six months or so, then talk to a health care professional. It could be HSDD—and soon there may be one more way of treating it!

Expert Author: 
Promotion Slots: 
Short Description: 
There’s hope on the horizon for women who experience low sexual desire, known as hypoactive sexual desire disorder. The FDA is reviewing a new treatment called bremelanotide.
field_vote: 
Select ratingGive Another Treatment for HSDD May Be Coming Soon! 1/5Give Another Treatment for HSDD May Be Coming Soon! 2/5Give Another Treatment for HSDD May Be Coming Soon! 3/5Give Another Treatment for HSDD May Be Coming Soon! 4/5Give Another Treatment for HSDD May Be Coming Soon! 5/5
Long Description: 
Show printer-friendly version and send by email buttons: 
No Image

Tired of Feeling Bloated? Do These 5 Things

24/07/2018 jleff 0

AttachmentSize

5 Easy Ways to Banish Bloat1.13 MB

Do you feel like you’re busting out of your jeans? Does your stomach feel puffy, gassy or distended? Maybe you’re blaming someone for shrinking your clothing, because, after all, it fit per…