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Dietary Supplement Facts You Shouldn’t Ignore

13/07/2018 veras 0

If you take dietary supplements, you’re not alone. Many health care providers recommend taking supplements to help balance a nutritional deficiency, but supplements are not always used properly. In fact, over 20,000 visits to the emergency room annuall…

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Best Exercises to Lose Weight

05/07/2018 veras 0

Doing any kind of exercise can help you lose weight. But some types of sweat sessions are better for weight loss than others. These workouts are typically high in intensity and burn lots of calories in a short amount of time.If weight loss is your goal…

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How Do You Feel About Compliments?

22/06/2018 veras 0

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Who Will and Who Won’t Get the Flu?

14/06/2018 veras 0

HealthDay News
THURSDAY, June 14, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Doctors can’t yet predict if someone exposed to the flu will become sick. But such predictions may be getting closer to reality, new research hints.

READ: 7 Things to Ease Your Flu Miseries

Researchers at Stanford University School of Medicine say they’ve identified a “biomarker” that indicates a person’s susceptibility to flu viruses.

“We’ve been after this for about four years,” said study senior author Purvesh Khatri, an associate professor of medicine and of biomedical data science.

“To our knowledge, it’s the first biomarker that shows susceptibility to influenza, across multiple strains,” Khatri said in a university news release.

A blood-based gene called KLRD1 reveals the presence of a type of immune cell believed crucial for halting flu infection in the early stages, the study authors said.

The higher the levels of this cell in someone’s blood, the less susceptible they are to the flu, the investigators said.

Khatri noted that the link between KLRD1 levels and influenza susceptibility is only an association, and doesn’t prove cause and effect. The next step is to find the mechanism that may be at work.

“It will be crucial to understand the role of natural killer cells’ protection so that we can potentially leverage that in designing better flu vaccines,” he said. “Since we see that natural killer cells are protective across different strains, maybe that would be a path to a universal flu vaccine.”

The ability to identify people at highest risk for flu infection could be very useful in certain situations, the researchers said.

“If, for example, there’s a flu epidemic going on, and Tamiflu supplies are limited, this data could help identify who should be [preventively] treated first,” Khatri said.

The study was published online June 14 in the journal Genome Medicine.

Copyright © 2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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High Blood Pressure in Your 50s May Set Stage for Dementia

13/06/2018 veras 0

WEDNESDAY, June 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Elevated blood pressure in your 50s might raise your risk of developing dementia later in life, a new European study has found. People with a systolic blood pressure of 130 or more at age 50 were 45 percent …

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Search Treatment Options for Cancer

16/05/2018 veras 0
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National Women’s Checkup Day: Why This Day Matters

11/05/2018 veras 0
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If you were offered the opportunity to find health problems before they started, wouldn’t you jump at the chance? National Women’s Checkup Day is a good time to remind you all that just one day of paying attention to your health could add years to your life.

Yet, despite that chance, when you consider the bulk of your to-do list, it’s no wonder that you might feel a bit weighed down with all the things competing for your time and attention.

And without fail, the something that almost always falls to the bottom of the list is you.

Yet, that thing—that most important thing—is too important to ignore. Sadly, many women feel that it’s selfish to put themselves first. This is the reason HealthyWomen partnered with GCI Health to launch the HealthiHer Movement. This new movement encourages women to make self-care a priority in their lives. Check out the HealthiHer Facebook page for more information and join our movement for a healthier life!

Taking care of yourself doesn’t mean you have to abandon all your responsibilities and escape to some far-flung paradise or escape to a spa for the day or even a few hours. It doesn’t mean you need to ignore everyone around you and only do things that bring you joy and fulfillment. 

Read about Self-Care Activities That Won’t Break the Bank.

National Women’s Checkup Day was created by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to remind women to take care of themselves and their health by scheduling appointments with their health care providers. It is celebrated annually on the second Monday of May as part of National Women’s Health Week. This year’s date is May 14. 

There are countless ways to stay healthy, but it all starts with taking control and making the time to see your health care provider. 

By taking control, you can often find problems early, when the chances of treating—and curing them—are better. By taking control, you have the opportunity to discuss and explore the proper screenings and exams that can rule out certain problems and highlight others. 

By taking control, you can get an idea of what’s going on in your body—things that you might otherwise be unaware of. For example, your blood pressure. High blood pressure is called “the silent killer” for a reason: You can have it and not know it. That’s because there are usually no symptoms—until it’s already done considerable damage to your heart and arteries. The best way to protect yourself is to have it checked and know what the numbers mean.  

Likewise, cancer and cholesterol screenings, vaccinations and your lifestyle and family history are all important matters worth exploring to help you stay healthy.  

It may cost a little bit of your time, but an annual checkup should not cost you anything extra if you have health insurance. Most health plans cover certain preventive care benefits without a co-pay, coinsurance or having to meet your deductible. (For those who need to find other options regardless of your ability to pay, click here.)

Different women need different things, depending on their age and health status. Here are some of the particulars (tests, medications or vaccines) the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services suggest a woman in her 50s should ask about each year:

If you don’t fall into that age group, click here to see what you need to do to take control of your health at any age. 

I urge you all to do it today. 

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National Nurses Week: Celebrating Those Who Care for Us

04/05/2018 veras 0

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Nurses are among the most committed and caring health care providers around.OK, I may be biased. In addition to running HealthyWomen, I am also a nurse. After graduating college with my business degree, I j…

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#BeHealthiHER

17/04/2018 veras 0

Make self-care a priority in your everyday life, so you can ultimately become a “healthier her”—for yourself and your family.

HealthyWomen, GCI Health, the leading healthcare-focused global public relations agency, and REDBOOK magazine, the iconic women’s magazine that reaches millions, partnered to launch a HealthiHER survey of women ages 30-60 years old to better understand how women feel about their health. CLICK HERE to read more about the results in REDBOOK magazine.

When you put your health first, everything else falls into place. Like most things, establishing a self-care routine that works for you will take time. Sign up for the weekly HealthiHER newsletter, which provides motivation, education, and healthy living tips you can realistically execute.

Subscribe to our HealthiHER newsletter

Want to get started right now?! We love it. There isn’t one right way to take care of yourself, so we’re giving you lots of options. These pillars from the International Self-Care Foundation are at the core of self-care. Start small, pick one thing to focus on and then build up.

Health Literacy
When you don’t understand or can’t act on your own health care, it can contribute to poor health. If you don’t comprehend instructions, you may have difficulty taking your medicine correctly or managing a health condition. CLICK HERE for how to improve your health literacy in 7 steps.

Self-Awareness of Physical and Mental Conditions
It’s important to measure and monitor your health. Key measurements of health include:

Knowing your family’s medical history. CLICK HERE for a printable family medical history questionnaire.

Staying up to date with preventive health screenings.CLICK HERE to see preventive health screenings for women.

Knowing your BMI. CLICK HERE to calculate your BMI.

Tracking your sleep patterns. CLICK HERE to find out how much sleep you really need.

Managing daily stressors. CLICK HERE for 6 tops to manage stress.

Focusing on your mental health. CLICK HERE for signs of mental illness.

Physical Activity
Regular exercise can significantly improve your overall health and mood. CLICK HERE to calculate your target heart rate.

Healthy Eating
Food is fuel for your body. Feed your body well, and you’ll feel well. CLICK HERE for healthy recipes.

Risk Avoidance or Mitigation
The key factors here are to:

Avoid smoking. CLICK HERE for 22 reasons you should quit smoking today.

Limit alcohol intake. CLICK HERE for signs of alcoholism..

Use sunscreen. CLICK HERE for how to use sunscreen the right way.

Good Hygiene
The most important part of hygiene is so simple: wash your hands. In addition to that, CLICK HERE for feminine hygiene tips.


Rational and Responsible Use of Products, Services, Diagnostics and Medicines
Think twice before you use over-the-counter medicines. CLICK HERE for OTC medicine safety guidelines.

Join the conversation by using #BeHealthiHER and visit us on Facebook.

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Should Your Insurance Cover Your Migraine Treatment?

15/11/2017 veras 0

Health insurers use a number of ways to cut costs for migraine medications. This can mean your health plan will not cover the medication your health care professional prescribed or you will have to show that your migraines have gotten worse before your…

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When Should I Get a Mammogram? The Answer and More

12/10/2017 veras 0

Women have many questions about mammograms: When should I get a mammogram? What type of mammograms are there? Does it hurt to get a mammogram? In an effort to provide more information, and answers to your questions, HealthyWomen CEO Beth Battaglino, RN…