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The Rise and Fall of Baby Aspirin

16/05/2019 veras 0

The Amazing Story of AspirinAspirin has a long history of fame dating back to its discovery from willow bark in the days of the ancient Egyptians. Hippocrates, the Greek physician, later considered it a miracle drug to treat pain from inflammation and …

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What Every Woman Needs to Know About Aging Healthfully

10/05/2019 veras 0

Happy National Women’s Health Week! This week, I’m focusing on things we can do now to promote good health as we age. Many of us feel indestructible when we are young. And that sense of invulnerability and invincibility is what, I suppose, allows us to…

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Mom Congress 2019: Fighting for What Worries Moms Most

07/05/2019 veras 0

HealthyWomen is excited to be taking part in Mom Congressan event for mothers from across the country to be heard. This three-day event (May 5-7, 2019) brings together moms, and those who support them, to talk with government leaders about what matters most in maternal and child health. Check out a live stream of the event, here. 

To help give the women who can’t attend Mom Congress a voice, HealthyWomen ran a survey of moms nationwide to pinpoint their top worries. We asked moms to tell us everything—from how work impacts family life and how they handle child care to how they pay for health care and whether they feel supported by health care professionals. All told, nearly 850 moms shared their concerns with us. We culled together the survey results and created a report that will help drive home what concerns moms the most, so advocates and legislators can work together to improve the very real lives of women and their families. Click here to read the full survey report. 

To learn more about what Mom Congress is advocating for, click here.

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Are Breast Implants Safe?

18/04/2019 veras 0

Women with breast implants are all around us. And many of these women have no health issues at all from these implants.But a recent report by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced that more cases of a cancer linked to breast implants ha…

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Gum Disease Shows Possible Links to Alzheimer’s

08/04/2019 veras 0

SUNDAY, April 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Regular brushing and flossing can save your teeth into old age.Could it also save your brain?The bacteria involved in gum disease might play a key role in the development of Alzheimer’s disease, new research su…

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Adding Blood Test for Pancreatic Cancer May Aid Early Detection

28/01/2019 veras 0

HealthDay News

MONDAY, Jan. 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Using a new blood test for pancreatic cancer alongside the current blood test may improve early detection and help screen people at high risk for the deadly disease, researchers say.

The combination approach detects 70 percent of pancreatic cancers with a less than 5 percent false-positive rate, according to the team led by scientists at the Van Andel Research Institute in Grand Rapids, Mich.

“We hope that our new test, when used in conjunction with the currently available test, will help doctors catch and treat pancreatic cancer in high-risk individuals before the disease has spread,” study senior author Brian Haab said in an institute news release.

Because it often doesn’t cause obvious early symptoms, pancreatic cancer is difficult to diagnose. In many cases, the cancer is at an advanced stage by the time it’s discovered. Only 8.5 percent of patients survive past five years.

Both blood tests measure levels of sugars produced by pancreatic cancer cells. The sugar measured by the new test — sTRA — is produced by a different subset of pancreatic cancers than CA-19-9, the sugar measured by the existing test.

When used together, there’s a better chance of detecting pancreatic cancers that may have been missed by one of the tests alone, the researchers said.

On its own, the current CA-19-9 test detects only about 40 percent of pancreatic cancers. It’s used to confirm a pancreatic cancer diagnosis or track disease progression, but not to screen for the disease.

The higher detection rate achieved by the combination of the new and current test means this approach could prove useful for screening and early intervention, particularly in people at higher risk for pancreatic cancer, according to the report.

That includes people with a family history of pancreatic cancer, those who’ve had pancreatic cysts or chronic pancreatitis, or those who were diagnosed with type 2 diabetes later in life.

“We believe using these tests in a complementary fashion will help physicians detect pancreatic cancers much sooner in the disease process, which significantly improves a patient’s chance for survival,” Haab said.

The results were published recently in the journal Clinical Cancer Research.

Haab and his colleagues are conducting further research to confirm the effectiveness of the combination testing.

Copyright © 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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Too Much Fried Food May Shorten Your Life

24/01/2019 veras 0

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Fried chicken, french fries and chicken-fried steak might be delicious, but treating yourself to such fare regularly could be deadly, a new study warns.
Women who eat more than one serving a week of fried c…

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Tales From a Retinal Detachment

23/01/2019 veras 0

I read somewhere that most of the things we worry about never end up happening. Instead, it’s the ones we don’t worry about that catch us unprepared.Such is—and was—true when I recently suffered a detached retina.Like so many other health conditions, t…

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How to Safely Use Plastic Containers in Your Microwave

23/01/2019 veras 0

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) — For many, a microwave is indispensable, but questions remain about the safety of containers used to cook and reheat food in it.
Most of the controversy surrounds the chemicals used to make plastic container…

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The Link Between Social Media and Depression

20/12/2018 veras 0

THURSDAY, Dec. 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Facebook, Twitter, Instagram — the list of popular social media outlets is long and always expanding. But could staying connected through them lead to depression?
That’s the question posed by researchers f…

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Best Dairy for Weight Loss

13/09/2018 veras 0

The importance of getting enough dairy into your day has likely been drilled into your brain thanks to the slogan, “Milk does the body good.” Dairy helps support muscle growth. It provides nutrients like vitamins, minerals and amino acids. It helps maintain bone health. It reduces your risk of heart disease, types 2 diabetes and blood pressure.

Dairy can be a tough arena to navigate, though, when you’re trying to lose weight. You may avoid it because of its fat content. A gram of fat  yields 9 calories, compared with 4 calories per gram for carbohydrates and proteins. High-fat dairy products also have long been thought to raise the risk of early death—particularly from heart disease, stroke and cancer—because of their high levels of saturated fat. 

However, high-fat dairy products may not be as awful as they’ve sometimes been made out to be. In fact, in one large review, consuming high-fat dairy was associated with a lower risk of weight gain over time. And a more recent analysis yielded some conflicting results, indicating that dairy seemed beneficial to circulatory health relating to the brain, and cheese yielded some surprisingly good results; however, milk itself was still associated with a greater risk of death from heart disease.

Confused? So are the experts, who say the jury is still out on full-fat milk and other dairy products. 

But, one thing is certain: Dairy contains good nutrients and, with its protein and fat content, can contribute to satiety—that feeling of fullness that lasts a while. If you eat dairy in moderation and consume mostly low-fat dairy, you can enjoy it while also watching your waistline. 

Here are some of the best dairy products to help promote weight loss.

Regular yogurt
Yogurt helps turn up your body’s fat burn. Both low-fat and regular-fat yogurts contain probiotics. That’s the friendly bacteria that may help reduce how much fat your body absorbs. Cells containing calcium also burn off more fat than those that don’t have it. This yogurt-containing orange creamsicle smoothie is the perfect choice for breakfast, dessert or snack time.

Greek yogurt
Delicious and creamy Greek yogurt increases levels of hormones that promote fullness. It’s made by removing whey and other liquids, creating a creamier and richer yogurt. Regular yogurt, especially flavored varieties, contain hidden sugar and additives. Plain Greek yogurt boasts plenty of protein. (Just be sure to opt for ones with little to no sugar.) Its tangy flavor goes well with nuts or berries, which also increases its mineral, fiber and vitamin content. Or, use it as a substitute for sour cream in sauces and dips. It’s made by removing whey and other liquids, creating a creamier and richer yogurt. This green smoothie will replenish nutrients and works for breakfast, lunch or a post-workout snack. The healthy fats and protein in the avocado and yogurt will keep you feeling full for hours.

Cottage cheese
You may think you have to give up cheese to lose weight. However, studies suggest that the calcium in cheese can help ward off fat. It prevents cellular changes in your body that cause fat stores. A study in Appetite found that cottage cheese’s filling effects are similar to those from eggs. Cottage cheese is an excellent source of protein and low in calories, too. It’s packed with nutrients like B vitamins, calcium, phosphorus and selenium. Even better is that it’s a great no-cook way to get some energy. It’s usually high in salt though, which isn’t good for your health and can make you thirstier. Seek low-sodium options. Looking for a low-fat snack? Try this Sweet Cottage Cheese recipe. Or whip up this Whole-Wheat Vegetable Lasagna. Veggie lovers will enjoy the fact that it has plenty of vitamins, protein and other nutrients thanks to its mixture of vegetables and cheeses.

Low-fat chocolate milk
Your childhood beverage of choice may do your waistline some good after a hard and long workout. A report found that chocolate milk is a great post-exercise recovery drink. It contains twice as much protein and carbs compared to regular milk or popular sports drinks. The combination of carbohydrates, protein and electrolytes in the milk helps your muscles recover faster. Because chocolate milk is high in sugar, stick with unsweetened milk at other times.

Portioned cheese spreads

A thin slice here, a thick slice there. It can be difficult to control how much cheese we’re eating. Portioned cheese snacks like spreadable wedges eliminate that portion control guesswork. Just don’t overdo it on the crackers.

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Dietary Supplement Facts You Shouldn’t Ignore

13/07/2018 veras 0

If you take dietary supplements, you’re not alone. Many health care providers recommend taking supplements to help balance a nutritional deficiency, but supplements are not always used properly. In fact, over 20,000 visits to the emergency room annuall…

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Best Exercises to Lose Weight

05/07/2018 veras 0

Doing any kind of exercise can help you lose weight. But some types of sweat sessions are better for weight loss than others. These workouts are typically high in intensity and burn lots of calories in a short amount of time.If weight loss is your goal…

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How Do You Feel About Compliments?

22/06/2018 veras 0

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Who Will and Who Won’t Get the Flu?

14/06/2018 veras 0

HealthDay News
THURSDAY, June 14, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Doctors can’t yet predict if someone exposed to the flu will become sick. But such predictions may be getting closer to reality, new research hints.

READ: 7 Things to Ease Your Flu Miseries

Researchers at Stanford University School of Medicine say they’ve identified a “biomarker” that indicates a person’s susceptibility to flu viruses.

“We’ve been after this for about four years,” said study senior author Purvesh Khatri, an associate professor of medicine and of biomedical data science.

“To our knowledge, it’s the first biomarker that shows susceptibility to influenza, across multiple strains,” Khatri said in a university news release.

A blood-based gene called KLRD1 reveals the presence of a type of immune cell believed crucial for halting flu infection in the early stages, the study authors said.

The higher the levels of this cell in someone’s blood, the less susceptible they are to the flu, the investigators said.

Khatri noted that the link between KLRD1 levels and influenza susceptibility is only an association, and doesn’t prove cause and effect. The next step is to find the mechanism that may be at work.

“It will be crucial to understand the role of natural killer cells’ protection so that we can potentially leverage that in designing better flu vaccines,” he said. “Since we see that natural killer cells are protective across different strains, maybe that would be a path to a universal flu vaccine.”

The ability to identify people at highest risk for flu infection could be very useful in certain situations, the researchers said.

“If, for example, there’s a flu epidemic going on, and Tamiflu supplies are limited, this data could help identify who should be [preventively] treated first,” Khatri said.

The study was published online June 14 in the journal Genome Medicine.

Copyright © 2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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High Blood Pressure in Your 50s May Set Stage for Dementia

13/06/2018 veras 0

WEDNESDAY, June 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Elevated blood pressure in your 50s might raise your risk of developing dementia later in life, a new European study has found. People with a systolic blood pressure of 130 or more at age 50 were 45 percent …