How eagle-eyed archers hit the target

13/08/2017 Dan Glaser 0

First, learn how to deliberately slow your heart through conscious will

The Glorious 12th, that archaic celebration that marks the start of the grouse shooting season, is upon us. Whatever we think about it, the skill itself is of interest to neuroscientists. Marksmanship depends on exquisite coordination between eye and hand, and while left- or right-handedness is well established, it is less known that you have a dominant eye, too. Test this by looking at a small, distant object. Point at it then follow your finger with your eyes. Close one, then another. You’ll discover your finger only lines up with your dominant eye.

True marksmen use biofeedback (gaining control over normally involuntary functions) to keep their hand steady, learning to deliberately slow their heart through conscious will to reduce the variability in their shooting.

Continue reading…

Crisp and Refreshing Apple, Fennel and Walnut Salad With Apple Cider Vinaigrette

13/08/2017 none 0

Recipe From Catherine
Katz

 

For many people, one of their fondest summer memories is holding
outdoor barbecue parties with their loved ones. Salads, of course, are always a
welcomed treat when it comes to these get-togethers. Whether it’s a simple crunchy
coleslaw or a “smashed” cucumber salad garnished with feta cheese, salads are
a wonderful complement to any meal, providing a crunchy contrast to grilled
meats and other savory food selections.

 

Here’s a delicious but easy-to-prepare salad that you can
enjoy: Crisp and Refreshing Apple, Fennel and Walnut Salad with Apple Cider
Vinaigrette. This recipe comes from Catherine Katz, and has been
published on her blog, Cuisine City, as well as on the website Naturally Savvy.
Try this wholesome salad recipe today!

 

Salad Ingredients:

1 large organic fennel bulb, rinsed and
sliced thinly

1 organic green apple, skin on, rinsed and
coarsely grated

1/4 cup chopped walnuts

 

Vinaigrette
Ingredients:

1/4 teaspoon Dijon mustard

3 tablespoons apple cider vinegar

3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

1/8 teaspoon salt

 

Procedure:

1. Place all the vinaigrette ingredients in a medium salad
bowl and whisk briskly.

2. Place the salad ingredients in vinaigrette bowl and toss
to coat well.

 

This recipe makes four to six servings.

 

Simple,
Budget Friendly and Versatile: Everything You Want in a Salad

 

You don’t need to raid your fridge’s crisper section just to come
up with a delicious salad. In fact, this easy recipe uses only three
ingredients — and yet the result is absolutely satisfying!

 

Perhaps one of the best things about this salad is that its
vinaigrette is made with a superstar ingredient: apple cider vinegar (ACV). Not
only does ACV provide a rich and tart flavor to this recipe, but it can boost
your health in numerous ways, as well.

 

Fun Facts
About Fennel

 

Did you know that every part of the fennel, from the feathery
fronds to the seeds inside, is edible? Yet, the most utilized part is the crunchy
pale green root, also known as the bulb. It has a mild yet distinct licorice
flavor, and goes great not just in
salads, but in
stews and soups, as well.

 

And if you think that it’s only recently that fennel is gaining
ground as a healthy ingredient, think again — it’s actually been used since
ancient times. Roman author Pliny used it to treat 22 different health
problems.[i]
Meanwhile, medieval emperor Charlemagne decreed that every garden should have
fennel growing in it, so people could take advantage of its healing properties.[ii]

 

Other systems of medicine, such as Ayurvedic and traditional
Chinese medicine (TCM) also make use of fennel. But what exactly does fennel
have to offer?

 

For starters, it has good amounts of vitamin C, which can help
eliminate free radicals from the body and may help reduce your risk of heart
attack and stroke. It also has dietary fiber, which prevents buildup of bad
cholesterol and absorbs water in the digestive system, potentially improving
digestion.

 

Other standout nutrients in fennel include potassium, folate,
manganese, iron, magnesium, calcium, copper and phosphorus, all of which have
their own impressive, health-boosting benefits. For example, potassium is
necessary for regulating bone cell generation, heart rate and muscle activity,
as well as lowering high blood pressure. Meanwhile, folate is essential for
pregnant women, as it helps reduce the risk of birth defects in their unborn
children.

 

You can easily buy fennel at farmers markets, but here’s a great
idea: Why not grow it in your garden? Check out this article on
how to
grow fennel
at home.

 

Remember: Buy
Organic Apples

 

Apples are available year-round on supermarket shelves, but please
keep in mind to always buy them organic. This is because apples are among the
most pesticide-laden fruits today, and are included in the Environmental
Working Group’s 2017 “Dirty Dozen” list.[iii]

 

You won’t regret making this choice, though, because organic apples
are one of the most nutritionally packed fruits out there. They are loaded with
vitamins C and A, which are both essential
antioxidants for
resisting infections and eliminating free radicals. Fiber is also abundant in
apples, as well as vitamins B1, B2 and B6, which work to support metabolism and
other vital processes in the body.

 

You can get copper, iron, phosphorus, zinc, potassium and calcium
from apples, too — minerals that are crucial to maintaining optimal blood
pressure levels and controlling heart rate.

 

Wonderful
Walnuts: One of the Healthiest Nuts Available

 

While I typically advise consuming macadamias and pecans, you
certainly can’t go wrong with adding walnuts to your meals. Walnuts are gaining
attention in the health community today, as they’ve been linked to a wide array
of benefits.

 

One study, for example, found that people who were at high risk of
diabetes were able to improve their blood vessel wall function and had lower
bad cholesterol levels after consuming 2 ounces of walnuts daily for six
months, and then removing them for another six months. There also were
improvements seen in other heart health variables, such as blood pressure and
body fat.[iv]

 

These benefits are not surprising, considering that walnuts offer
the highest level of antioxidants among all nuts. Some unique examples include
the flavonol morin, the tannin tellimagrandin and the quinone
juglone — all of which are powerful at scavenging free radicals.[v]

 

In addition, walnuts contain l-arginine, an amino acid
that has numerous vascular benefits, especially for people suffering from, or
have an increased risk of, heart disease. You can also get plant-based omega-3
fat alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) from walnuts, which has anti-inflammatory
benefits.

 

Just remember to eat walnuts (and other nuts) in
moderation, as consuming them in excessive amounts may lead to too much dietary
protein in your system, which can expose you to many health problems. W
alnuts
actually fall into the mid-range level, as far as carbs and protein are
concerned. You can eat them every day, but please do so in moderate quantities.

 

Tart and
Refreshing, This Apple Cider Vinaigrette Offers You Wholesome Benefits

 

The basic vinaigrette uses two base ingredients, oil and vinegar, which
are blended with a variety of herbs and spices to give it depth of flavor.
While most recipes call for red wine vinegar, black vinegar or balsamic
vinegar, this one uses ACV, which is perhaps one of the most beneficial (yet
understated) condiments you have in your kitchen pantry.

 

So what exactly does apple cider vinegar do? This video offers an
excellent summary of how it can benefit your body:

 

Embed:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZlIYWi2mNvE

 

Aside from cooking, apple cider vinegar can have home cleaning and
personal hygiene purposes. Check out this
article on
ways to use apple cider vinegar
at home.

 

One last reminder: Use organic, unfiltered and unprocessed
vinegar. It should be murky, unlike distilled white vinegar, which is clear
(and is best used for cleaning). The murkiness comes from the “mother,” which
is a cobweb-like substance that contains all the benefits this liquid can give.
The mother is a sure sign that you’re using a high-quality product.

 

About the
Blog:

 

Founded by a Holistic Nutritionist and a trusted expert on healthy
living,
Naturally Savvy’s main focus is to make sure its
readers eat organic and non-GMO whole foods, while learning how to integrate
nutrition into their daily lives. The website shares the latest news on healthy
living, how to properly read food labels and other tips to make you and your
family live a happy and healthy life.

How to Help Heal Mental Disorders With Nutrition

13/08/2017 Dr. Mercola 0

By Dr. Mercola

Can you use specific nutrients to improve your mental health? Yes, you can.
William Walsh, Ph.D., president of the nonprofit Walsh Research Institute in Naperville, Illinois, and author of “Nutrient Power: Heal Your Biochemistry and Heal Your Brain,” specializes in nutrient-based psychiatry and nutritional medicine.

He and I are both  fellows of the American College of Nutrition. He’s designed nutritional programs for Olympic athletes, NBA players and major league baseball players. More importantly, he’s spent a great deal of his career seeking to improve mental health through nutrition.

“I started off in the hard science. I was an experimentalist,” Walsh says. “I worked, in the beginning, in the nuclear field … with places like Los Alamos, the Institute for Atomic Research and University of Michigan Research Institute. I wound up at Argonne National Laboratory. While working as a scientist there, I started a volunteer project at the local prison, Stateville Penitentiary.

I eventually got really interested in why people were violent …  [W]hen we started the ex-offender program, I got to meet the families that had produced a criminal. I found some wonderful families, caring and capable families, that have other children who turned out just fine …

I began to realize we didn’t understand why people had bad behavior. We then asked the question, ‘Could it be something related to their brain chemistry or the body chemistry?’… I started doing lab studies of their blood, their urine and hair. I found out that they were very, very different from the rest of the population. That’s how I got started.”

Biochemistry and the Criminal Brain

Walsh received valuable direction after meeting Dr. Carl Pfeiffer, who was doing work on heavy metals and schizophrenia. As it turns out, levels of metals, including copper, zinc and manganese, were all abnormal in criminals compared to the general population.

Walsh discovered four biochemical types of violent people. One of these was the sociopaths, all of whom had severe zinc deficiency, pyrrole disorder, low blood spermine and undermethylation. In all, it’s an unusual combination of bad biochemistry. A collaborative investigation with Pfeiffer resulted in nutrient therapies for each of the behavior types.

Pyrrole disorder is a stress condition commonly found in brain disorders. A urine test developed by niacin expert Abram Hoffer and Pfeiffer is the gold standard test for this genetic condition, which involves altered  biochemistry in your bone marrow and spleen.

People who have pyrrole disorder may produce five to 10 times more pyrroles than normal — a byproduct of natural reactions, like the formation of hemoglobin. While harmless in and of itself, pyrroles bind to and draw out anything that is an aldehyde, such as B-6. It also sharply depletes zinc.

As a result, people with pyrroles disorder have exceptionally low levels of B-6, and zinc which can have serious effects on brain function, affecting their memory and ability to read, for example. B-6 deficiency is quite common among children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) as well.

The Earlier the Treatment the Better the Results

“Eventually, [Pfeiffer] and I jointly evaluated 500 patients, mostly violent adults and violent children. We got our best results with the kids, young people with the same kind of chemistry, who were mostly very violent,” Walsh says.

“I have to say we didn’t really succeed in finding a way to help the adult criminals. They would get better for six to eight months, and then I’d find out they were back in prison. That had a lot to do with the fact that they were abusing alcohol and illegal drugs … At about 1990, we decided to focus on children …

It’s been very successful. If we can get a child before their lives are ruined, before they pass puberty perhaps, our success rate [is] very high … The doctors report a striking improvement in behavior. Most of these kids, of course, [are] on drugs, everything from Ritalin to powerful antipsychotic  medications. Usually when we’re finished and [have] balanced their chemistry, they can wean off the medication. They usually are fine without it …”

Nutrients Involved in Synthesis or Functioning of Neurotransmitters Dictate Mental Function

Later on, Walsh expanded to also include children with autism and ADHD. Fond of numbers, Walsh began amassing enormous databases. At present, he has one of the world’s largest chemistry database for autism, depression and behavior disorders.

“When you look at these millions of chemical analyses of blood, urine and tissues, it’s obvious that there are very great differences,” he says. “I found that for mental disorders, about six or seven chemical imbalances dominate mental function. There are hundreds and hundreds of important nutrients in the body, but in the brain, there are about six or seven that [seem] to dominate everything. Eventually, I found out why …

[T]hese are the nutrient factors that are either involved in synthesis of a neurotransmitter or the functioning of a neurotransmitter. They include methylation — undermethylation or overmethylation. In our database, 70 percent of all humans in the United States have normal, typical methylation; 22 percent are undermethylated … 8 percent are overmethylated.

About 70 percent of all people who have a mental disorder have one of these methylation disorders. The symptoms are completely different, and the treatment they need is completely different. We also found that most people [who have mental disorders] are depleted or deficient in zinc. That’s the most common [deficiency] we see … Virtually everyone with a mental disorder seems to need zinc and improve on it.”

Copper Overload Linked to Autism, Schizophrenia and Postpartum Depression

Copper is another important trace metal, as it plays a distinct role in the synthesis of norepinephrine, a major neurotransmitter. Divalent copper (Cu2+) is a dramatic factor in the ratio of dopamine and norepinephrine.

Animal studies have shown that when animals are starved of copper until they only have 25 percent of the normal amount of copper in their blood, the ratio between norepinephrine and dopamine is changed by more than a factor of three. Most of us have the ability to homeostatically control copper. However, some do not have that ability.

“It all has to do with an enzyme called metallothionein that is genetically expressed. Some people don’t have that system working,” Walsh explains. “These persons have copper overload, which we find virtually in every autistic patient, most patients with schizophrenia and almost everyone with postpartum depression.

That’s a recipe for very high norepinephrine — which means anxiety and depression — and low dopamine (a feel-good neurotransmitter), which is a hallmark of ADHD … a nasty combination.

We find the sociopaths innately have low copper levels. People who have undermethylation tend to have low normal copper levels … The good news for mental disorders is that there are more than 100 really important biochemicals in the body, but only a few dominate mental disorders.

If we had to do lab testing for 100 of them, it would be really difficult. If we had to adjust the levels of these and normalize 100 different factors, it would make life very difficult. But we found that by just focusing on maybe seven or eight nutrient factors, we could help 95 percent of the patients we see with nutrient therapy.”

How to Measure Your Zinc and Copper Status

Zinc experts typically agree that plasma zinc provides the most accurate measurement. The taste test has some minor value but is among the least reliable. To accurately measure copper, serum copper is the way to go, and most labs throughout the world provide good copper assays.

Walsh recommends doing a ceruloplasmin test at the same time, because then you can determine how much free radical copper you have, which gives you a good indication of your level of oxidative stress. A high sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP) test would also be useful as a marker of inflammation.

“By the way, oxidative stress runs through every single mental disorder we see, without exception,” Walsh says. “Every one of them seems to have extraordinary oxidative stress — schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, a violent child or an autistic child.”

Unfortunately, our modern lifestyle strongly promotes oxidative stress, with processed foods, processed vegetable oils, excessive net carbs and excessive protein being some of the most potent factors. This kind of diet causes a reduction in ketones and a radical increase in reactive oxygen species and secondary free radicals.

Exposure to non-native electromagnetic fields, glyphosate and other pesticides, fluoride-contaminated water and other toxic exposures only add to the problem. Typically, copper and ceruloplasmin levels tend to go hand in hand, being either high or low together. The ideal level for copper, with respect to mental health, is somewhere between 75 and 100 micrograms per deciliter (mcg/dL) in serum. The ideal amount of ceruloplasmin has to do with whatever your level of copper is.

Ideally, the percentage of copper in your ceruloplasmin should be around 85 to 90 percent. “It’s really great to do both simultaneously, because then you have a really good picture of not only the copper situation, but also the level of oxidative stress,” Walsh says.

The Importance of Methylation in Mental Health

Walsh was among the first people to alert the world to the importance of methylation in mental health, especially autism. The No. 1 causes of undermethylation are single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) or mutations in the enzymes for the one-carbon cycle (the methylation cycle).

“The No. 1 factor is the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), which is one of the enzymes. That’s the rate-limiting step for that whole cycle, for most people,” Walsh explains. “Genetic testing services such as 23andMe can provide this kind of information.

However, most human beings have enormous numbers of SNPs. They’ve already found 10 million snips (or mutations) in the human genome. Every human being has thousands of these SNPs. A really high percentage of people have even the more serious MTHFR SNPs — the C677T, the A1298C that people are always talking about.

The thing that is often mistaken by nutritional scientists is that if a person has the homozygous, the double copies of the C677T, it doesn’t necessarily mean they’re undermethylated. It certainly doesn’t mean that they will benefit if you give them methylfolate. That’s one of the problems that we’re finding.

The reason is epigenetics. You have to consider the epigenetics and the methylation at the same time. There are three nutrient factors that affect epigenetics more than anything else: folates, methionine and S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe). These have a really powerful impact on epigenetics.”

How Folates Affect Epigenetics

Folates are serotonin reuptake promoters. However, even if an individual is undermethylated and has a problem related to low serotonin activity, such as depression or anxiety, folates should not be given, Walsh warns. The reason? If you give folate, their methylation will improve and the patient will actually get worse.

The reason for this worsening is because, epigenetically, folates act as deacetylase inhibitors and sharply lower serotonin activity. Most autistic individuals will not have a serotonin problem and will thrive on methyl folate. However, an estimated 10 percent of autistic children and adults do have a serotonin issue and will severely regress if given methyl folate.

“We’ve had thousands of patients who were undermethylated depressives. I’ve seen more than 3,000 cases of clinical depression. I’ve got this huge database. The largest phenotype … is undermethylation.

But if you gave them any form of folate, they would get worse. Their methylation would improve, they would get worse, because it has a dramatic impact on serotonin reuptake. In contrast, methionine and SAMe are natural serotonin reuptake inhibitors.

They do essentially the same thing that Prozac and Paxil do. Folates have the opposite effect. Folates are wonderful if you want to knock dopamine level down in schizophrenics or people who have high anxiety — overmethylated people. It’s counterintuitive because folates are excellent methylating agents..”

To reiterate, some undermethylated people are intolerant to folates, and some overmethylated people thrive on folates even though folates improve methylation. As you can see, there are epigenetic complexities involved here, making self-diagnosis and self-treatment highly inadvisable.

It could be quite risky to take these bits and pieces of information and try to apply them on your own. There are simply too many variables. So, the bottom line here is to make sure you’re being treated by a knowledgeable professional.

Heavy Metals and the Autistic Brain

Walsh has tested 6,500 autistic patients. As a group, they have much higher toxic metal levels than their siblings or the general population. Walsh believes their toxic burden is likely due to an inborn predisposition that makes them more likely to accumulate toxins and/or vulnerable to the effects of toxins.

“Thousands of these parents, maybe more than half, told a very sad story of how they had a child who was developing normally, was beginning to speak and was singing and charming their grandparents. Then maybe the child got sick.

They took him to a pediatrician and the pediatrician — I’ve heard this story hundreds of times — said, ‘Oh, you’re behind on your shots. You’re behind on your vaccinations.’ They took a sick child and gave them multiple vaccinations, at that time, with thimerosal and mercury.

Hundreds of these families said that within a day or two, their child changed forever. Lost all speech, the personality changed, they became sick. They became intolerant to served foods. They were just very troubled little human beings.

When they went to specialists, eventually they wound up with the diagnosis of autism and were told that it was incurable and that there was no hope really for recovery. We’ve seen a lot of human misery just talking with these families. It’s just a shocking and terrible thing.”

Walsh suspects autistic children have an insufficiency of natural antioxidants such as glutathione and metallothionein, rendering them more vulnerable to the effects of environmental exposures, including vaccines and poor diet. It’s worth noting that 1 in 3 children diagnosed with autism does not have true autism caused by epigenetic variations.

Many of these children have a good chance of recovery, whereas classic Kanner autism is a permanent, life-long epigenetic condition (named after Leo Kanner, who discovered autism in the 1940s1), although some measure of improvement can be made even in these cases.

On Thimerosal

Walsh has also investigated the thimerosal issue, looking for evidence of mercury toxicity in the brains of autistic children. In fact, he was the first person to actually measure mercury in autistic brains.

He was able to receive brain tissue samples from Johns Hopkins, and using the Argonne facility called the Advanced Photon Source, he did over 1 million chemical analyses on brain tissue from autistic and non-autistic children. Every autistic child analyzed had received thimerosal-containing vaccinations.

However, no mercury could be found in the brain tissue. One explanation for this is that the tests were done years after the vaccinations. The half-life of mercury in the human body is 42 days. The half-life of ethyl or methyl mercury in the brain is 70 days.

“I think what it amounts to is that mercury is a terrible poison. It’s a terrible insult,” he says. “I think these vulnerable kids should never be exposed to it. However, it doesn’t stay in the body and it doesn’t do continuing damage. I think after a year or so, it has left the body, even though there are tens of thousands of families who are trying therapies that will take the mercury out of their child’s brain when it’s no longer there.”

Metallothionein Promotion Nutrient Therapy for Autism

The fact that autistic children tend to have extraordinary copper and zinc imbalances means their metallothionein protein is not functioning. Metallothionein is required for homeostatic control of copper and zinc. Walsh has developed a metallothionein promotion nutrient therapy: a formulation of 22 nutrients known to enhance genetic expression and function of metallothionein. This protocol has been used on more than 2,000 autistic patients, with measurable improvements in outcome.

“The most important antioxidants in the brain are somewhat different than the rest of the body. I call them the three musketeers. It’s glutathione, metallothionein and selenium. It’s specific to the brain,” he explains.

Technically, selenium is not an antioxidant per se, but it does increase glutathione levels and enhances the function of metallothionein and, in the brain, glutathione and metallothionein work together. Glutathione is your first line of defense. The problem is, autistic children typically have a poor diet (it’s hard to get them to eat anything) and with the oxidative overload, they quickly run out of glutathione. When you run low on glutathione in your brain, your metallothionein level increases.

“Metallothionein doesn’t work unless you have oxidized glutathione. It’s a hand in glove situation. It’s the backup system for glutathione in the brain, and we know that without selenium, that whole system doesn’t work well,” Walsh explains.

I take selenium every day. It’s a trace mineral, so you don’t need much, up to about 200 mcg per day, and you definitely need to be mindful not to overdose. As noted by Walsh, of all the trace metals, selenium has the narrowest division between deficiency and overload, so you need to be careful when supplementing.

Zinc also needs to be normalized, as it is the No. 1 factor for enabling metallothionein to function and support glutathione. According to Walsh, for mental and physical health, you need a plasma zinc level between 90 and 130 mcg/dL. Many mental patients have a genetic weakness in zinc normalization; they’re born with zinc deficiency, and need far higher amounts than typical to maintain a healthy zinc level.

Changing the Face of Psychiatry

Walsh is convinced the use of psychiatric medication will eventually fade away as we learn more about normalizing brain function through nutritional interventions. “These powerful drugs … they do not normalize the brain. They cause an abnormal condition,” he warns. “They might correct depression or anxiety, but you wind up with something that’s not normal.”

The Walsh Research Institute is a public charity with no financial interests, and they are slowly but surely helping to change mainstream psychiatry. Walsh has given talks at the highest levels, including the Surgeon General’s office, the U.S. Senate and the National Institutes of Health (NIH). He’s also spoken at American Psychiatric Association (APA) annual meetings several times.

“The last time I went there, they finally listened to me … I was there about two and a half years ago. I gave an invited talk on depression. I basically explained to them they’re doing depression wrong. They actually listened to me. I showed them our huge chemistry database and explained that depression is a name given to at least five completely different disorders, each involving different symptoms and each involving different neurotransmitters that are malfunctioning.

Then I described each one of these biotypes and actually showed them that if they would simply do some inexpensive blood and urine testing, they could identify which people would be good candidates for selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) or which ones would do better on benzodiazepine, but even more importantly, how they can correct it with nutrients.”

There were 17,000 psychiatrists at this meeting from all over the world, and Walsh was 1 of 4 speakers at a well-attended session. Afterward, there was tremendous demand for more information, which gives hope. Walsh also offers a training program for doctors. In the U.S., 45 psychiatrists went through the program last year. In all, 500 physicians and psychiatrists in 32 countries have taken his program so far.

Why SSRIs Induce Violence

One major problem with SSRI antidepressants is the risk of self-harm and aggression as a side effect. Overmethylated, low-folate depressors are intolerant so SSRIs, and evidence suggests this genetic intolerance may have been a factor in many school shootings.
Walsh, who has studied this phenomenon, notes 42 of the 50 major school shootings in the U.S. since 1990 were done by teens or young adults taking an SSRI.

“I discussed this … before the APA … I tried to explain to them that they … can do a blood test; they can find out which children or which adults are more likely to become violent if they get an SSRI. I’ve written about this several times; published it in magazines …

If you buy Prozac or Paxil, the insert inside warns that some people … are prone to suicidal or homicidal behavior. We now know which ones they are!”

More Information

To learn more, visit www.WalshInstitute.org. There you can also purchase Walsh’s book, “Nutrient Power: Heal Your Biochemistry and Heal Your Brain.” Questions and information requests can be sent to Dana@WalshInstitute.org, or you can call (630) 506-5066.

“Our website has a resources section that recommends quality labs, compounding pharmacies and a list of doctors who we’ve trained, who are now able to do this kind of therapy,” Walsh says.

Crisp and Refreshing Apple, Fennel and Walnut Salad With Apple Cider Vinaigrette

13/08/2017 none 0

Recipe From Catherine
Katz

 

For many people, one of their fondest summer memories is holding
outdoor barbecue parties with their loved ones. Salads, of course, are always a
welcomed treat when it comes to these get-togethers. Whether it’s a simple crunchy
coleslaw or a “smashed” cucumber salad garnished with feta cheese, salads are
a wonderful complement to any meal, providing a crunchy contrast to grilled
meats and other savory food selections.

 

Here’s a delicious but easy-to-prepare salad that you can
enjoy: Crisp and Refreshing Apple, Fennel and Walnut Salad with Apple Cider
Vinaigrette. This recipe comes from Catherine Katz, and has been
published on her blog, Cuisine City, as well as on the website Naturally Savvy.
Try this wholesome salad recipe today!

 

Salad Ingredients:

1 large organic fennel bulb, rinsed and
sliced thinly

1 organic green apple, skin on, rinsed and
coarsely grated

1/4 cup chopped walnuts

 

Vinaigrette
Ingredients:

1/4 teaspoon Dijon mustard

3 tablespoons apple cider vinegar

3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

1/8 teaspoon salt

 

Procedure:

1. Place all the vinaigrette ingredients in a medium salad
bowl and whisk briskly.

2. Place the salad ingredients in vinaigrette bowl and toss
to coat well.

 

This recipe makes four to six servings.

 

Simple,
Budget Friendly and Versatile: Everything You Want in a Salad

 

You don’t need to raid your fridge’s crisper section just to come
up with a delicious salad. In fact, this easy recipe uses only three
ingredients — and yet the result is absolutely satisfying!

 

Perhaps one of the best things about this salad is that its
vinaigrette is made with a superstar ingredient: apple cider vinegar (ACV). Not
only does ACV provide a rich and tart flavor to this recipe, but it can boost
your health in numerous ways, as well.

 

Fun Facts
About Fennel

 

Did you know that every part of the fennel, from the feathery
fronds to the seeds inside, is edible? Yet, the most utilized part is the crunchy
pale green root, also known as the bulb. It has a mild yet distinct licorice
flavor, and goes great not just in
salads, but in
stews and soups, as well.

 

And if you think that it’s only recently that fennel is gaining
ground as a healthy ingredient, think again — it’s actually been used since
ancient times. Roman author Pliny used it to treat 22 different health
problems.[i]
Meanwhile, medieval emperor Charlemagne decreed that every garden should have
fennel growing in it, so people could take advantage of its healing properties.[ii]

 

Other systems of medicine, such as Ayurvedic and traditional
Chinese medicine (TCM) also make use of fennel. But what exactly does fennel
have to offer?

 

For starters, it has good amounts of vitamin C, which can help
eliminate free radicals from the body and may help reduce your risk of heart
attack and stroke. It also has dietary fiber, which prevents buildup of bad
cholesterol and absorbs water in the digestive system, potentially improving
digestion.

 

Other standout nutrients in fennel include potassium, folate,
manganese, iron, magnesium, calcium, copper and phosphorus, all of which have
their own impressive, health-boosting benefits. For example, potassium is
necessary for regulating bone cell generation, heart rate and muscle activity,
as well as lowering high blood pressure. Meanwhile, folate is essential for
pregnant women, as it helps reduce the risk of birth defects in their unborn
children.

 

You can easily buy fennel at farmers markets, but here’s a great
idea: Why not grow it in your garden? Check out this article on
how to
grow fennel
at home.

 

Remember: Buy
Organic Apples

 

Apples are available year-round on supermarket shelves, but please
keep in mind to always buy them organic. This is because apples are among the
most pesticide-laden fruits today, and are included in the Environmental
Working Group’s 2017 “Dirty Dozen” list.[iii]

 

You won’t regret making this choice, though, because organic apples
are one of the most nutritionally packed fruits out there. They are loaded with
vitamins C and A, which are both essential
antioxidants for
resisting infections and eliminating free radicals. Fiber is also abundant in
apples, as well as vitamins B1, B2 and B6, which work to support metabolism and
other vital processes in the body.

 

You can get copper, iron, phosphorus, zinc, potassium and calcium
from apples, too — minerals that are crucial to maintaining optimal blood
pressure levels and controlling heart rate.

 

Wonderful
Walnuts: One of the Healthiest Nuts Available

 

While I typically advise consuming macadamias and pecans, you
certainly can’t go wrong with adding walnuts to your meals. Walnuts are gaining
attention in the health community today, as they’ve been linked to a wide array
of benefits.

 

One study, for example, found that people who were at high risk of
diabetes were able to improve their blood vessel wall function and had lower
bad cholesterol levels after consuming 2 ounces of walnuts daily for six
months, and then removing them for another six months. There also were
improvements seen in other heart health variables, such as blood pressure and
body fat.[iv]

 

These benefits are not surprising, considering that walnuts offer
the highest level of antioxidants among all nuts. Some unique examples include
the flavonol morin, the tannin tellimagrandin and the quinone
juglone — all of which are powerful at scavenging free radicals.[v]

 

In addition, walnuts contain l-arginine, an amino acid
that has numerous vascular benefits, especially for people suffering from, or
have an increased risk of, heart disease. You can also get plant-based omega-3
fat alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) from walnuts, which has anti-inflammatory
benefits.

 

Just remember to eat walnuts (and other nuts) in
moderation, as consuming them in excessive amounts may lead to too much dietary
protein in your system, which can expose you to many health problems. W
alnuts
actually fall into the mid-range level, as far as carbs and protein are
concerned. You can eat them every day, but please do so in moderate quantities.

 

Tart and
Refreshing, This Apple Cider Vinaigrette Offers You Wholesome Benefits

 

The basic vinaigrette uses two base ingredients, oil and vinegar, which
are blended with a variety of herbs and spices to give it depth of flavor.
While most recipes call for red wine vinegar, black vinegar or balsamic
vinegar, this one uses ACV, which is perhaps one of the most beneficial (yet
understated) condiments you have in your kitchen pantry.

 

So what exactly does apple cider vinegar do? This video offers an
excellent summary of how it can benefit your body:

 

Embed:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZlIYWi2mNvE

 

Aside from cooking, apple cider vinegar can have home cleaning and
personal hygiene purposes. Check out this
article on
ways to use apple cider vinegar
at home.

 

One last reminder: Use organic, unfiltered and unprocessed
vinegar. It should be murky, unlike distilled white vinegar, which is clear
(and is best used for cleaning). The murkiness comes from the “mother,” which
is a cobweb-like substance that contains all the benefits this liquid can give.
The mother is a sure sign that you’re using a high-quality product.

 

About the
Blog:

 

Founded by a Holistic Nutritionist and a trusted expert on healthy
living,
Naturally Savvy’s main focus is to make sure its
readers eat organic and non-GMO whole foods, while learning how to integrate
nutrition into their daily lives. The website shares the latest news on healthy
living, how to properly read food labels and other tips to make you and your
family live a happy and healthy life.

How to Help Heal Mental Disorders With Nutrition

13/08/2017 Dr. Mercola 0

By Dr. Mercola

Can you use specific nutrients to improve your mental health? Yes, you can.
William Walsh, Ph.D., president of the nonprofit Walsh Research Institute in Naperville, Illinois, and author of “Nutrient Power: Heal Your Biochemistry and Heal Your Brain,” specializes in nutrient-based psychiatry and nutritional medicine.

He and I are both  fellows of the American College of Nutrition. He’s designed nutritional programs for Olympic athletes, NBA players and major league baseball players. More importantly, he’s spent a great deal of his career seeking to improve mental health through nutrition.

“I started off in the hard science. I was an experimentalist,” Walsh says. “I worked, in the beginning, in the nuclear field … with places like Los Alamos, the Institute for Atomic Research and University of Michigan Research Institute. I wound up at Argonne National Laboratory. While working as a scientist there, I started a volunteer project at the local prison, Stateville Penitentiary.

I eventually got really interested in why people were violent …  [W]hen we started the ex-offender program, I got to meet the families that had produced a criminal. I found some wonderful families, caring and capable families, that have other children who turned out just fine …

I began to realize we didn’t understand why people had bad behavior. We then asked the question, ‘Could it be something related to their brain chemistry or the body chemistry?’… I started doing lab studies of their blood, their urine and hair. I found out that they were very, very different from the rest of the population. That’s how I got started.”

Biochemistry and the Criminal Brain

Walsh received valuable direction after meeting Dr. Carl Pfeiffer, who was doing work on heavy metals and schizophrenia. As it turns out, levels of metals, including copper, zinc and manganese, were all abnormal in criminals compared to the general population.

Walsh discovered four biochemical types of violent people. One of these was the sociopaths, all of whom had severe zinc deficiency, pyrrole disorder, low blood spermine and undermethylation. In all, it’s an unusual combination of bad biochemistry. A collaborative investigation with Pfeiffer resulted in nutrient therapies for each of the behavior types.

Pyrrole disorder is a stress condition commonly found in brain disorders. A urine test developed by niacin expert Abram Hoffer and Pfeiffer is the gold standard test for this genetic condition, which involves altered  biochemistry in your bone marrow and spleen.

People who have pyrrole disorder may produce five to 10 times more pyrroles than normal — a byproduct of natural reactions, like the formation of hemoglobin. While harmless in and of itself, pyrroles bind to and draw out anything that is an aldehyde, such as B-6. It also sharply depletes zinc.

As a result, people with pyrroles disorder have exceptionally low levels of B-6, and zinc which can have serious effects on brain function, affecting their memory and ability to read, for example. B-6 deficiency is quite common among children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) as well.

The Earlier the Treatment the Better the Results

“Eventually, [Pfeiffer] and I jointly evaluated 500 patients, mostly violent adults and violent children. We got our best results with the kids, young people with the same kind of chemistry, who were mostly very violent,” Walsh says.

“I have to say we didn’t really succeed in finding a way to help the adult criminals. They would get better for six to eight months, and then I’d find out they were back in prison. That had a lot to do with the fact that they were abusing alcohol and illegal drugs … At about 1990, we decided to focus on children …

It’s been very successful. If we can get a child before their lives are ruined, before they pass puberty perhaps, our success rate [is] very high … The doctors report a striking improvement in behavior. Most of these kids, of course, [are] on drugs, everything from Ritalin to powerful antipsychotic  medications. Usually when we’re finished and [have] balanced their chemistry, they can wean off the medication. They usually are fine without it …”

Nutrients Involved in Synthesis or Functioning of Neurotransmitters Dictate Mental Function

Later on, Walsh expanded to also include children with autism and ADHD. Fond of numbers, Walsh began amassing enormous databases. At present, he has one of the world’s largest chemistry database for autism, depression and behavior disorders.

“When you look at these millions of chemical analyses of blood, urine and tissues, it’s obvious that there are very great differences,” he says. “I found that for mental disorders, about six or seven chemical imbalances dominate mental function. There are hundreds and hundreds of important nutrients in the body, but in the brain, there are about six or seven that [seem] to dominate everything. Eventually, I found out why …

[T]hese are the nutrient factors that are either involved in synthesis of a neurotransmitter or the functioning of a neurotransmitter. They include methylation — undermethylation or overmethylation. In our database, 70 percent of all humans in the United States have normal, typical methylation; 22 percent are undermethylated … 8 percent are overmethylated.

About 70 percent of all people who have a mental disorder have one of these methylation disorders. The symptoms are completely different, and the treatment they need is completely different. We also found that most people [who have mental disorders] are depleted or deficient in zinc. That’s the most common [deficiency] we see … Virtually everyone with a mental disorder seems to need zinc and improve on it.”

Copper Overload Linked to Autism, Schizophrenia and Postpartum Depression

Copper is another important trace metal, as it plays a distinct role in the synthesis of norepinephrine, a major neurotransmitter. Divalent copper (Cu2+) is a dramatic factor in the ratio of dopamine and norepinephrine.

Animal studies have shown that when animals are starved of copper until they only have 25 percent of the normal amount of copper in their blood, the ratio between norepinephrine and dopamine is changed by more than a factor of three. Most of us have the ability to homeostatically control copper. However, some do not have that ability.

“It all has to do with an enzyme called metallothionein that is genetically expressed. Some people don’t have that system working,” Walsh explains. “These persons have copper overload, which we find virtually in every autistic patient, most patients with schizophrenia and almost everyone with postpartum depression.

That’s a recipe for very high norepinephrine — which means anxiety and depression — and low dopamine (a feel-good neurotransmitter), which is a hallmark of ADHD … a nasty combination.

We find the sociopaths innately have low copper levels. People who have undermethylation tend to have low normal copper levels … The good news for mental disorders is that there are more than 100 really important biochemicals in the body, but only a few dominate mental disorders.

If we had to do lab testing for 100 of them, it would be really difficult. If we had to adjust the levels of these and normalize 100 different factors, it would make life very difficult. But we found that by just focusing on maybe seven or eight nutrient factors, we could help 95 percent of the patients we see with nutrient therapy.”

How to Measure Your Zinc and Copper Status

Zinc experts typically agree that plasma zinc provides the most accurate measurement. The taste test has some minor value but is among the least reliable. To accurately measure copper, serum copper is the way to go, and most labs throughout the world provide good copper assays.

Walsh recommends doing a ceruloplasmin test at the same time, because then you can determine how much free radical copper you have, which gives you a good indication of your level of oxidative stress. A high sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP) test would also be useful as a marker of inflammation.

“By the way, oxidative stress runs through every single mental disorder we see, without exception,” Walsh says. “Every one of them seems to have extraordinary oxidative stress — schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, a violent child or an autistic child.”

Unfortunately, our modern lifestyle strongly promotes oxidative stress, with processed foods, processed vegetable oils, excessive net carbs and excessive protein being some of the most potent factors. This kind of diet causes a reduction in ketones and a radical increase in reactive oxygen species and secondary free radicals.

Exposure to non-native electromagnetic fields, glyphosate and other pesticides, fluoride-contaminated water and other toxic exposures only add to the problem. Typically, copper and ceruloplasmin levels tend to go hand in hand, being either high or low together. The ideal level for copper, with respect to mental health, is somewhere between 75 and 100 micrograms per deciliter (mcg/dL) in serum. The ideal amount of ceruloplasmin has to do with whatever your level of copper is.

Ideally, the percentage of copper in your ceruloplasmin should be around 85 to 90 percent. “It’s really great to do both simultaneously, because then you have a really good picture of not only the copper situation, but also the level of oxidative stress,” Walsh says.

The Importance of Methylation in Mental Health

Walsh was among the first people to alert the world to the importance of methylation in mental health, especially autism. The No. 1 causes of undermethylation are single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) or mutations in the enzymes for the one-carbon cycle (the methylation cycle).

“The No. 1 factor is the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), which is one of the enzymes. That’s the rate-limiting step for that whole cycle, for most people,” Walsh explains. “Genetic testing services such as 23andMe can provide this kind of information.

However, most human beings have enormous numbers of SNPs. They’ve already found 10 million snips (or mutations) in the human genome. Every human being has thousands of these SNPs. A really high percentage of people have even the more serious MTHFR SNPs — the C677T, the A1298C that people are always talking about.

The thing that is often mistaken by nutritional scientists is that if a person has the homozygous, the double copies of the C677T, it doesn’t necessarily mean they’re undermethylated. It certainly doesn’t mean that they will benefit if you give them methylfolate. That’s one of the problems that we’re finding.

The reason is epigenetics. You have to consider the epigenetics and the methylation at the same time. There are three nutrient factors that affect epigenetics more than anything else: folates, methionine and S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe). These have a really powerful impact on epigenetics.”

How Folates Affect Epigenetics

Folates are serotonin reuptake promoters. However, even if an individual is undermethylated and has a problem related to low serotonin activity, such as depression or anxiety, folates should not be given, Walsh warns. The reason? If you give folate, their methylation will improve and the patient will actually get worse.

The reason for this worsening is because, epigenetically, folates act as deacetylase inhibitors and sharply lower serotonin activity. Most autistic individuals will not have a serotonin problem and will thrive on methyl folate. However, an estimated 10 percent of autistic children and adults do have a serotonin issue and will severely regress if given methyl folate.

“We’ve had thousands of patients who were undermethylated depressives. I’ve seen more than 3,000 cases of clinical depression. I’ve got this huge database. The largest phenotype … is undermethylation.

But if you gave them any form of folate, they would get worse. Their methylation would improve, they would get worse, because it has a dramatic impact on serotonin reuptake. In contrast, methionine and SAMe are natural serotonin reuptake inhibitors.

They do essentially the same thing that Prozac and Paxil do. Folates have the opposite effect. Folates are wonderful if you want to knock dopamine level down in schizophrenics or people who have high anxiety — overmethylated people. It’s counterintuitive because folates are excellent methylating agents..”

To reiterate, some undermethylated people are intolerant to folates, and some overmethylated people thrive on folates even though folates improve methylation. As you can see, there are epigenetic complexities involved here, making self-diagnosis and self-treatment highly inadvisable.

It could be quite risky to take these bits and pieces of information and try to apply them on your own. There are simply too many variables. So, the bottom line here is to make sure you’re being treated by a knowledgeable professional.

Heavy Metals and the Autistic Brain

Walsh has tested 6,500 autistic patients. As a group, they have much higher toxic metal levels than their siblings or the general population. Walsh believes their toxic burden is likely due to an inborn predisposition that makes them more likely to accumulate toxins and/or vulnerable to the effects of toxins.

“Thousands of these parents, maybe more than half, told a very sad story of how they had a child who was developing normally, was beginning to speak and was singing and charming their grandparents. Then maybe the child got sick.

They took him to a pediatrician and the pediatrician — I’ve heard this story hundreds of times — said, ‘Oh, you’re behind on your shots. You’re behind on your vaccinations.’ They took a sick child and gave them multiple vaccinations, at that time, with thimerosal and mercury.

Hundreds of these families said that within a day or two, their child changed forever. Lost all speech, the personality changed, they became sick. They became intolerant to served foods. They were just very troubled little human beings.

When they went to specialists, eventually they wound up with the diagnosis of autism and were told that it was incurable and that there was no hope really for recovery. We’ve seen a lot of human misery just talking with these families. It’s just a shocking and terrible thing.”

Walsh suspects autistic children have an insufficiency of natural antioxidants such as glutathione and metallothionein, rendering them more vulnerable to the effects of environmental exposures, including vaccines and poor diet. It’s worth noting that 1 in 3 children diagnosed with autism does not have true autism caused by epigenetic variations.

Many of these children have a good chance of recovery, whereas classic Kanner autism is a permanent, life-long epigenetic condition (named after Leo Kanner, who discovered autism in the 1940s1), although some measure of improvement can be made even in these cases.

On Thimerosal

Walsh has also investigated the thimerosal issue, looking for evidence of mercury toxicity in the brains of autistic children. In fact, he was the first person to actually measure mercury in autistic brains.

He was able to receive brain tissue samples from Johns Hopkins, and using the Argonne facility called the Advanced Photon Source, he did over 1 million chemical analyses on brain tissue from autistic and non-autistic children. Every autistic child analyzed had received thimerosal-containing vaccinations.

However, no mercury could be found in the brain tissue. One explanation for this is that the tests were done years after the vaccinations. The half-life of mercury in the human body is 42 days. The half-life of ethyl or methyl mercury in the brain is 70 days.

“I think what it amounts to is that mercury is a terrible poison. It’s a terrible insult,” he says. “I think these vulnerable kids should never be exposed to it. However, it doesn’t stay in the body and it doesn’t do continuing damage. I think after a year or so, it has left the body, even though there are tens of thousands of families who are trying therapies that will take the mercury out of their child’s brain when it’s no longer there.”

Metallothionein Promotion Nutrient Therapy for Autism

The fact that autistic children tend to have extraordinary copper and zinc imbalances means their metallothionein protein is not functioning. Metallothionein is required for homeostatic control of copper and zinc. Walsh has developed a metallothionein promotion nutrient therapy: a formulation of 22 nutrients known to enhance genetic expression and function of metallothionein. This protocol has been used on more than 2,000 autistic patients, with measurable improvements in outcome.

“The most important antioxidants in the brain are somewhat different than the rest of the body. I call them the three musketeers. It’s glutathione, metallothionein and selenium. It’s specific to the brain,” he explains.

Technically, selenium is not an antioxidant per se, but it does increase glutathione levels and enhances the function of metallothionein and, in the brain, glutathione and metallothionein work together. Glutathione is your first line of defense. The problem is, autistic children typically have a poor diet (it’s hard to get them to eat anything) and with the oxidative overload, they quickly run out of glutathione. When you run low on glutathione in your brain, your metallothionein level increases.

“Metallothionein doesn’t work unless you have oxidized glutathione. It’s a hand in glove situation. It’s the backup system for glutathione in the brain, and we know that without selenium, that whole system doesn’t work well,” Walsh explains.

I take selenium every day. It’s a trace mineral, so you don’t need much, up to about 200 mcg per day, and you definitely need to be mindful not to overdose. As noted by Walsh, of all the trace metals, selenium has the narrowest division between deficiency and overload, so you need to be careful when supplementing.

Zinc also needs to be normalized, as it is the No. 1 factor for enabling metallothionein to function and support glutathione. According to Walsh, for mental and physical health, you need a plasma zinc level between 90 and 130 mcg/dL. Many mental patients have a genetic weakness in zinc normalization; they’re born with zinc deficiency, and need far higher amounts than typical to maintain a healthy zinc level.

Changing the Face of Psychiatry

Walsh is convinced the use of psychiatric medication will eventually fade away as we learn more about normalizing brain function through nutritional interventions. “These powerful drugs … they do not normalize the brain. They cause an abnormal condition,” he warns. “They might correct depression or anxiety, but you wind up with something that’s not normal.”

The Walsh Research Institute is a public charity with no financial interests, and they are slowly but surely helping to change mainstream psychiatry. Walsh has given talks at the highest levels, including the Surgeon General’s office, the U.S. Senate and the National Institutes of Health (NIH). He’s also spoken at American Psychiatric Association (APA) annual meetings several times.

“The last time I went there, they finally listened to me … I was there about two and a half years ago. I gave an invited talk on depression. I basically explained to them they’re doing depression wrong. They actually listened to me. I showed them our huge chemistry database and explained that depression is a name given to at least five completely different disorders, each involving different symptoms and each involving different neurotransmitters that are malfunctioning.

Then I described each one of these biotypes and actually showed them that if they would simply do some inexpensive blood and urine testing, they could identify which people would be good candidates for selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) or which ones would do better on benzodiazepine, but even more importantly, how they can correct it with nutrients.”

There were 17,000 psychiatrists at this meeting from all over the world, and Walsh was 1 of 4 speakers at a well-attended session. Afterward, there was tremendous demand for more information, which gives hope. Walsh also offers a training program for doctors. In the U.S., 45 psychiatrists went through the program last year. In all, 500 physicians and psychiatrists in 32 countries have taken his program so far.

Why SSRIs Induce Violence

One major problem with SSRI antidepressants is the risk of self-harm and aggression as a side effect. Overmethylated, low-folate depressors are intolerant so SSRIs, and evidence suggests this genetic intolerance may have been a factor in many school shootings.
Walsh, who has studied this phenomenon, notes 42 of the 50 major school shootings in the U.S. since 1990 were done by teens or young adults taking an SSRI.

“I discussed this … before the APA … I tried to explain to them that they … can do a blood test; they can find out which children or which adults are more likely to become violent if they get an SSRI. I’ve written about this several times; published it in magazines …

If you buy Prozac or Paxil, the insert inside warns that some people … are prone to suicidal or homicidal behavior. We now know which ones they are!”

More Information

To learn more, visit www.WalshInstitute.org. There you can also purchase Walsh’s book, “Nutrient Power: Heal Your Biochemistry and Heal Your Brain.” Questions and information requests can be sent to Dana@WalshInstitute.org, or you can call (630) 506-5066.

“Our website has a resources section that recommends quality labs, compounding pharmacies and a list of doctors who we’ve trained, who are now able to do this kind of therapy,” Walsh says.

Mental health and the media: when privacy trumps getting the story | Andrew Stafford

13/08/2017 Andrew Stafford 0

At what point, when the initial story is over, do news outlets and social media need to continue to stalk, hound and dig for every tiny detail?

For five days over late August and early September in 2016, a strange case gripped the Australian media. A family of five abruptly went missing from their rural property east of Melbourne. They left their house unlocked and all potential trace elements behind: phones, credit cards and identification documents. Keys were left in the ignitions of the remaining cars.

The alarm was sounded by one of the three adult children, about 24 hours after their disappearance, when he disembarked from what turned out to be an ill-fated road trip near Bathurst in central New South Wales, about 800km from their home. The two remaining daughters were quickly located after they stole a vehicle to escape; one of them later turned up in the back of a man’s ute – to the shock of the driver. Their mother was found the following day, wandering the streets of Yass, near Canberra; two days later, the father was discovered, safe but dehydrated, on the outskirts of the north-eastern Victorian town of Wangaratta.

Related: Julia Gillard: the stigma around mental health nearly cost Australia its greatest leader

OMG, can we please talk about the [name withheld] family mystery? Someone needs to call Sarah Koenig, seriously, this is the weirdest story. Can Sarah Koenig please make season three of Serial about this?

I, for one, would prefer multiple skull fractures to the feeling of deep clinical depression

Related: Mental health experts criticise new Netflix film about anorexic girl

Related: Sarah Wilson on living with anxiety: there’s no sugarcoating mental illness

On reading the article or book in question, he has to face the fact that the journalist – who seemed so friendly and sympathetic, so keen to understand him fully, so remarkably attuned to his vision of things – never had the slightest intention of collaborating with him on his story but always intended to write a story of his own.

Related: Thank you, Sinéad O’Connor, for showing the messy reality of mental illness | Paris Lees

Related: The secret life of a clickbait creator: lousy content, dodgy ads, demoralised staff

Continue reading…

Better way to measure blood pressure

Automatic blood pressure devices are often used to assess blood pressure levels at home and in the clinic. But these devices are prone to significant errors, sometimes leading to the prescription of blood pressure-lowering medications to patients who don’t actually need them. Researchers have now developed a method to more accurately measure systolic blood pressure.

The Observer view on best medical practice for pregnant women | Observer editorial

13/08/2017 Observer leader 0

The ideal birth is the one that is safest for mother and baby

The announcement by the Royal College of Midwives (RCM) on Saturday that it will finally abandon its “normal birth” campaign is overdue but welcome. By promoting “normal” over medical births, the campaign has for too long dangerously implied that a non-medical birth is superior to one in which doctors are involved. Given that we have had firm evidence for more than two years that, in the very worst cases, normal birth ideology has contributed to the tragic and unnecessary deaths of women and babies, the only question is why it has taken the RCM so long to act.

Continue reading…

A Fun Fashionista Day at The Met Costume Exhibition

12/08/2017 helen 0

Being a fashionista at heart (although I now wear yoga leggings most days), I so look forward to my yearly visit to the Metropolitan Museum of Art (Met) Costume Exhibition with my BFF J and BFF N. It is a high point of the summer. This year was no exception. The exhibition was a feast for the eyes and I can’t wait to share my photos.

Are you ready for a visual extravaganza?

The 2017 “Rei Kawakubo/Comme des Garçons: Art of the In-Between” exhibition features the Japanese designer Rei Kawakubo, who designs under the label Comme des Garçons. Kawakubo is in her mid-70s today and is a true artist. The exhibition is mesmerizing with clothes artfully displayed atop and inside geometrically arranged white display cases and cylinders.

Are you ready to be transformed by fashion as art?

“Her fashions not only stand apart from the genealogy of clothing but also resist definition and confound interpretation. They can be read as Zen koans or riddles devised to baffle, bemuse, and bewilder,” notes the printed guide. “At the center of her work are the koan mu (emptiness) and the related notion of ma (space), which coexist in the concept of the ‘in-between.'”

Are you ready to channel your inner fashionista?

We followed the map around the exhibition, which led us on a path through nine expressions of Kawakubo’s ‘in-betweenness’: Absence/Presence; Design/Not Design; Fashion/Antifashion; Model/Multiple; High/Low; Then/Now; Self/Other; Object/Subject; and Clothes/Not Clothes.

The duality of the designs reminded me of my yoga studies and the duality and equanimity we try to create with yoga poses. In fact, it was so Zen in the exhibition hall at times I wished I could have put down a mat and done yoga among the clothes. (I wonder if The Met would like to have me host a Kawakubo yoga session. Maybe I should ask them.)

Are you ready for my Insta-worthy Kawakubo photos?

Ooh, ahh, ooh, ahh! 

Drumroll please! 

1. Absence/Presence: “My clothes and the species they inhabit are inseparable—they are one and the same. They convey the same vision, the same message and the same sense of values.”  Rei Kawakubo (2017).

 

5.2 High/Low: “There’s value in bad taste.” Rei Kawakubo (2008).

7. Self/Other: From Kawakubo’s Cubism spring/summer 2007 collection.

7.3.4 Child/Adult: “Focuses on ensembles that not only challenge the rules of age-appropriate dressing but also engage the concept of kawaii (cuteness)—a key aspect of Japanese popular culture.” This pink floral dress features an oversize stuffed teddy bear camouflaged within frills. (Spring/summer 2014).

8. Object/Subject: These Body Meets Dress—Dress Meets Body dresses and coats are padded with goose down. Spring/summer 1997.

9.1 Form/Function: “Personally, I don’t care about function at all … When I hear ‘Where could you wear that?’ or ‘It’s not very wearable,’ or ‘Who would wear that?’ to me it’s just a sign that someone missed the point.” Kawakubo 2009 and 2014

9.4 War/Peace: From the Blood and Roses 2015 Collection. “Roses and Blood appear in both literal and abstract form, and both are represented through the color palette—poppy red.”

9.4 War/Peace: From the Flowering Clothes Collection, autumn/winter 1996-97.

9.7 Order/Chaos: Collection 18th-Century Punk. “The clothes conflate the pneumatic structures and hyperbolic silhouettes of the 1700s with the leitmotifs of 1970s punk.” Autumn/winter 2016-17.

Did you like the photos? Which outfit would you wear? Leave a comment and LMK. (Personally, I would like to try on the red gingham with the goose down humps. Rihanna wore one of the dresses from the Punk Collection at the 2017 Met Gala.)

If you are a fashionista like me and want to be inspired by the entire exhibition I encourage you to take a trip to The Met, where Rei Kawakubo designs are on display through September 4. Or go to this link, scroll down the page to The Met video, and watch the video narrated by Met Costume Institute Curator Andrew Bolton.

This post originally appeared on aboomerslifeafter50.com.

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Costume exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art is a study in the duality of design—and a feast for the eyes.

A Fun Fashionista Day at The Met Costume Exhibition

12/08/2017 helen 0

Being a fashionista at heart (although I now wear yoga leggings most days), I so look forward to my yearly visit to the Metropolitan Museum of Art (Met) Costume Exhibition with my BFF J and BFF N. It is a high point of the summer. This year was no exception. The exhibition was a feast for the eyes and I can’t wait to share my photos.

Are you ready for a visual extravaganza?

The 2017 “Rei Kawakubo/Comme des Garçons: Art of the In-Between” exhibition features the Japanese designer Rei Kawakubo, who designs under the label Comme des Garçons. Kawakubo is in her mid-70s today and is a true artist. The exhibition is mesmerizing with clothes artfully displayed atop and inside geometrically arranged white display cases and cylinders.

Are you ready to be transformed by fashion as art?

“Her fashions not only stand apart from the genealogy of clothing but also resist definition and confound interpretation. They can be read as Zen koans or riddles devised to baffle, bemuse, and bewilder,” notes the printed guide. “At the center of her work are the koan mu (emptiness) and the related notion of ma (space), which coexist in the concept of the ‘in-between.'”

Are you ready to channel your inner fashionista?

We followed the map around the exhibition, which led us on a path through nine expressions of Kawakubo’s ‘in-betweenness’: Absence/Presence; Design/Not Design; Fashion/Antifashion; Model/Multiple; High/Low; Then/Now; Self/Other; Object/Subject; and Clothes/Not Clothes.

The duality of the designs reminded me of my yoga studies and the duality and equanimity we try to create with yoga poses. In fact, it was so Zen in the exhibition hall at times I wished I could have put down a mat and done yoga among the clothes. (I wonder if The Met would like to have me host a Kawakubo yoga session. Maybe I should ask them.)

Are you ready for my Insta-worthy Kawakubo photos?

Ooh, ahh, ooh, ahh! 

Drumroll please! 

1. Absence/Presence: “My clothes and the species they inhabit are inseparable—they are one and the same. They convey the same vision, the same message and the same sense of values.”  Rei Kawakubo (2017).

 

5.2 High/Low: “There’s value in bad taste.” Rei Kawakubo (2008).

7. Self/Other: From Kawakubo’s Cubism spring/summer 2007 collection.

7.3.4 Child/Adult: “Focuses on ensembles that not only challenge the rules of age-appropriate dressing but also engage the concept of kawaii (cuteness)—a key aspect of Japanese popular culture.” This pink floral dress features an oversize stuffed teddy bear camouflaged within frills. (Spring/summer 2014).

8. Object/Subject: These Body Meets Dress—Dress Meets Body dresses and coats are padded with goose down. Spring/summer 1997.

9.1 Form/Function: “Personally, I don’t care about function at all … When I hear ‘Where could you wear that?’ or ‘It’s not very wearable,’ or ‘Who would wear that?’ to me it’s just a sign that someone missed the point.” Kawakubo 2009 and 2014

9.4 War/Peace: From the Blood and Roses 2015 Collection. “Roses and Blood appear in both literal and abstract form, and both are represented through the color palette—poppy red.”

9.4 War/Peace: From the Flowering Clothes Collection, autumn/winter 1996-97.

9.7 Order/Chaos: Collection 18th-Century Punk. “The clothes conflate the pneumatic structures and hyperbolic silhouettes of the 1700s with the leitmotifs of 1970s punk.” Autumn/winter 2016-17.

Did you like the photos? Which outfit would you wear? Leave a comment and LMK. (Personally, I would like to try on the red gingham with the goose down humps. Rihanna wore one of the dresses from the Punk Collection at the 2017 Met Gala.)

If you are a fashionista like me and want to be inspired by the entire exhibition I encourage you to take a trip to The Met, where Rei Kawakubo designs are on display through September 4. Or go to this link, scroll down the page to The Met video, and watch the video narrated by Met Costume Institute Curator Andrew Bolton.

This post originally appeared on aboomerslifeafter50.com.

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Costume exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art is a study in the duality of design—and a feast for the eyes.

The growing gulf in life expectancy shows how austerity has deepened inequalities

12/08/2017 Denis Campbell 0

The prime minister vowed to fight health injustice. These new figures must be a wake-up call

Public health experts sometimes rework the map of a city’s train or underground system to illustrate the wide differences in life expectancy between wealthy areas and poor ones. For example, every one of the eight stops travelled on the London tube’s Jubilee line east from Westminster, the heart of government, to post-industrial Canning Town in the East End counts for up to a year in diminished life expectancy.

In Glasgow, in the course of the seven-stop trip south-east from Jordanhill to Bridgeton, the average male life expectancy drops from 75.8 years to 61.9 years. In Newcastle upon Tyne, adults living near the airport can hope to remain free of disease and disability – to enjoy healthy life – until just before they turn 75. But a few miles east in Byker that enviable period typically ends before the official retirement age, at just 63.8 years.

Continue reading…

The growing gulf in life expectancy shows how austerity has deepened inequalities

12/08/2017 Denis Campbell 0

The prime minister vowed to fight health injustice. These new figures must be a wake-up call

Public health experts sometimes rework the map of a city’s train or underground system to illustrate the wide differences in life expectancy between wealthy areas and poor ones. For example, every one of the eight stops travelled on the London tube’s Jubilee line east from Westminster, the heart of government, to post-industrial Canning Town in the East End counts for up to a year in diminished life expectancy.

In Glasgow, in the course of the seven-stop trip south-east from Jordanhill to Bridgeton, the average male life expectancy drops from 75.8 years to 61.9 years. In Newcastle upon Tyne, adults living near the airport can hope to remain free of disease and disability – to enjoy healthy life – until just before they turn 75. But a few miles east in Byker that enviable period typically ends before the official retirement age, at just 63.8 years.

Continue reading…

Health inequality gap ‘is still growing’ in England, new Department of Health data shows

Poor people face years of failing health and earlier death compared to the rich, despite government pledges to reduce inequality

The health gap between rich and poor is growing in England, according to shocking figures compiled by the Department of Health.

Despite government pledges to reduce inequalities in areas such as life expectancy and susceptibility to disability and disease, those living in the most deprived areas of the country run a greater risk of premature death, seeing a child die soon after it is born, and of ending up in hospital as an emergency case. Differing health outcomes for the rich and the poor were identified by Theresa May last year as a “burning injustice”.

Continue reading…

Health inequality gap ‘is still growing’ in England, new Department of Health data shows

Poor people face years of failing health and earlier death compared to the rich, despite government pledges to reduce inequality

The health gap between rich and poor is growing in England, according to shocking figures compiled by the Department of Health.

Despite government pledges to reduce inequalities in areas such as life expectancy and susceptibility to disability and disease, those living in the most deprived areas of the country run a greater risk of premature death, seeing a child die soon after it is born, and of ending up in hospital as an emergency case. Differing health outcomes for the rich and the poor were identified by Theresa May last year as a “burning injustice”.

Continue reading…

How Safe and Effective Is Your Sunscreen?

12/08/2017 helen 0

HealthDay News

FRIDAY, Aug. 11, 2017 (HealthDay News)—It may be easier than ever to find sunscreen with all the right stuff, but be sure to read the label or you could still get burned.

Most sunscreens sold at major U.S. retailers and their websites now offer broad-spectrum protection, are water-resistant and have an SPF (sun protection factor) of 30 or higher as the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) recommends, a new study found.

But more than a third of sunscreens sold by several of the nation’s largest retailers fell short. Forty-one percent of sunscreens did not meet all three recommendations, researchers from the University of Miami and University of Michigan reported.

Tanning and bronzing products, in particular, tended to be lacking, the researchers said.

In a follow-up to a 2014 study, the researchers checked more than 470 sunscreens available at big pharmacy websites to see if they met the AAD guidelines.

“Even in just three years, we’ve seen pretty impressive improvement,” said Dr. Matilda Nicholas, a board-certified dermatologist at Duke Health in Durham, N.C. “But I think there’s still confusion, based on what my patients ask me.”

The study found:

  • More than 8 out of 10 sunscreens sold at two chains have the recommended SPF of 30 or higher.
  • More than 9 out of 10 products checked give broad-spectrum protection, meaning they block both UVA (ultraviolet A) and UVB (ultraviolet B) rays. UVA penetrates the skin more deeply and is thought to cause more skin aging. UVB rays are the main cause of sunburn. Both cause skin cancer, the most common cancer in the United States, affecting 1 in 5 Americans, according to the Skin Cancer Foundation.
  • More than three-quarters of sunscreens evaluated are water-resistant for 40 to 80 minutes.
  • In all, about 70 percent of products met all three AAD recommendations. As with the 2014 study, tanning and bronzing products were far less likely to do so.

“We had hypothesized that not much would have changed, but there were some positive results and hopefully, we will continue to move in the right direction,” said study corresponding author Dr. Ariel Eva Eber, of the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine.

She said the availability of more products with broad-spectrum protection was especially positive.

“It’s the one thing that maybe a general person would not understand about,” Eber said. “They hear about SPF and water resistance, but if someone just went aimlessly to pick sunscreen off a shelf, they’d probably end up with one with broad-spectrum coverage, and that’s encouraging.”

Alex Webb of Hillsborough, N.C., spends a lot of time outdoors. He hikes, hunts and fishes and works part-time for a construction company. Like many baby boomers, he had some bad sunburns as a kid, boosting his skin cancer risk. So he tries to be careful.

“When I’m out in the sun, I apply sunscreen, wear a brimmed hat and sunglasses,” said Webb, 64. “I also have a couple of SPF long sleeve shirts of thin material for hot weather. I look for some shade and take an umbrella for the beach.”

He’s also extra careful at the shore, mindful that the reflection from water and sand “seems to make you burn quicker.”

That’s savvy strategy, according to Duke’s Nicholas, who noted many people seem confused about sun protection. She suspects it’s because there are so many different sunscreens—from lotions to foams to sprays.

Her No. 1 recommendation: Look for a product containing zinc oxide.

The same ingredient in diaper creams, zinc oxide blocks both UVA and UVB rays, Nicholas said. For kids and adults who sweat or swim a lot, zinc oxide sticks are easy to use. Products containing titanium dioxide are also effective sunblockers, she added.

“If you choose zinc oxide 30 SPF or higher, it’d be pretty hard to go wrong. But I remind my patients that no sunscreen will work if you don’t use it,” Nicholas said.

And, she added, don’t be stingy. Most people use too little product. A golf-ball-sized glob will provide head-to-toe coverage for most, and it should be reapplied every two hours—at least.

If you’re swimming or sweating a lot, reapply every 40 to 80 minutes as directed on the label. Products designed for wet skin can be slathered on without toweling off, and different formulas have different feels, Nicholas said. Choose one that offers good protection and has a feel you like.

Be wary of so-called “natural” products with herbal ingredients, she advised, and compare product labels. Products marketed for infants often have ingredients identical to others but may cost more.

The safest strategy is also the cheapest.

“It’s hard for people to hear this, but sometimes it’s just best to seek shade in the middle of the day,” Nicholas said. “In the summer, it’s really challenging to completely protect yourself.”

The study was published as a letter in the August issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

SOURCES: Ariel Eva Eber, M.D., University of Miami Miller School of Medicine; Matilda Nicholas, M.D., Ph.D., dermatologist, Duke Health, and associate professor, dermatology, Duke University, Durham, N.C.; Alex Webb, outdoorsman/construction worker, Hillsborough, N.C.; August 2017, Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology

Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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