My brother is awful to my parents and we think he has mental health issues

11/08/2017 Guardian Staff 0

He has had serious mood swings for most of his adult life, but my parents are scared to confront him in case he stops them seeing their grandchildren

I am concerned about how my brother treats my parents. He is 39, has a family of his own and is apparently a good dad, but he is controlling, moody and insular. His sulks and mood swings have become unbearable and my parents never know what mood he will be in when he visits. Increasingly, he is spiteful, abrupt, ungrateful and rude. My parents are the most loving, giving parents and there has never been an incident to trigger his behaviour. He has had serious mood swings for most of his adult life and hasn’t spoken to me for 20 years. My parents are scared to confront him in case he reacts and prevents them from seeing their grandchildren. My mother tried speaking to him during his last stay, but there is absolutely no reasoning with him and he shuts down and backs away. He is now not speaking to either of them and has told them they are not welcome at his home. We are sure he has mental health issues, but there is no way he will ask for help. How can this ever get better?

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Surgery must be a core part of health care – even in the poorest countries

11/08/2017 David Barash 0

Surgery-treatable conditions kill more people than TB, Malaria and AIDS combined – how can access to surgery be improved in developing countries?

The world has made tremendous progress in dealing with many of the health challenges that have global impact – for example, maternal and infant mortality rates have been massively reduced and there’s been promising advances in the treatment of HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria. But there is one area that the global health community has overlooked – surgery.

Related: ‘It’s like millions of ants are biting my bones’ – fighting sickle cell disease in Nigeria

Related: Six jobs the new World Health Organisation leader should prioritise

Related: ‘Oh god please let me die’: treating women who have set themselves on fire in Afghanistan

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Is there less stigma around taking Viagra?

Viagra use among men has tripled. We’d like you to tell us whether you take it and why

The number of prescriptions for viagra and other erectile dysfunction drugs have nearly tripled in the last decade, data shows.

Some believe this is because of increased awareness among men of sildenafil, sold as the brand name Viagra, as a medication for a serious illness. They believe it has reduced stigma around erectile dysfunction.

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How Is Bacterial Vaginosis Treated?

11/08/2017 jleff 0

If you have a thin, milky vaginal discharge that’s white or gray, has a fishy odor and causes pain, itching or burning in the vagina, don’t rush to the drugstore to buy an over-the-counter treatment for a yeast infection. These are more likely symptoms of bacterial vaginosis (BV), a common vaginal infection that needs to be diagnosed by your health care professional.

Most women will experience a vaginal infection with discharge, odor and itching at some time in their life, but the symptoms and the treatment vary, depending on the type of infection. That’s why it’s important to be evaluated by your health care provider as soon as symptoms appear.

Your health care provider will likely conduct a physical examination, ask questions about your personal life and medical history and may send samples to the lab for testing.

The three main causes of vaginal discharge are BV, trichomoniasis and vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC), often referred to as a “yeast infection.” Though these may produce some similar symptoms, there are differences—and they are treated differently.

For example, the discharge from VVC looks sort of like cottage cheese, while the discharge with trichomoniasis is yellowish-green. However, even a health care professional will not rely on sight alone to make a diagnosis and prescribe treatment.

Many women don’t seek medical help for vaginal symptoms. They wait for them to go away or try to self-diagnose their problem. A recent online survey of 1,969 women, conducted by HealthyWomen in partnership with Symbiomix Therapeutics, shows that only four out of 10 women visited their health care professional when they experienced abnormal vaginal discharge. The others sought advice from family, friends or the Internet; used an over-the-counter, natural or home remedy; or just waited for the symptoms to subside.

While some BV infections will resolve on their own, most do not. They can be successfully treated with prescription medications, but, if left untreated, BV can worsen, spread and increase the risk of sexually transmitted infections including HIV, as well as pelvic inflammatory disease, which may lead to infertility.

That’s why it’s important to get evaluated by a health care professional and seek treatment if you suffer from any of the following symptoms:

  • A thin white or gray milky discharge

  • A fishy odor

  • Pain, itching or burning in the vagina

  • Itching around the vagina

BV is usually curable using prescription antibiotics. These antibiotics may be oral or topical (inserted into the vagina with an applicator). All antibiotics have potential side effects, sometimes serious, so talk to your health care provider about your prescription and read labels carefully to be aware of any potential side effects.

Be sure to take antibiotics for the fully prescribed time. The most common BV prescriptions are for either five days for the vaginal creams or seven days for the oral medications. Many of the prescription treatments advise that women not drink any alcohol while taking the medication.

Because vaginal treatments can be messy and interfere with sex and oral treatments have other restrictions and side effects, some women indicate they’d prefer a different treatment. In the recent online survey about BV, nearly 9 of 10 women (88%) said they’d be interested in an oral BV medication that they would only have to take once.

With existing options, women often don’t take the full course of antibiotic treatment. Common reasons they stop include: side effects of the treatment; their symptoms disappear; or they don’t want to abstain from alcohol. If a woman does not complete the full course of treatment, it increases the likelihood of the infection returning.

Studies show there is no need to treat male sexual partners for BV, but if you have a female sexual partner, she should seek treatment if you have a BV infection.

Some evidence indicates that probiotics may help prevent and treat BV, but more research is needed.

If you suspect you may have BV, see your health care provider for a diagnosis and to discuss treatment options.

This resource was developed with the support of Symbiomix Therapeutics, LLC.

References

  1. https://www.cdc.gov/std/bv/stdfact-bacterial-vaginosis.htm
  2. https://www.cdc.gov/std/treatment/2010/vaginal-discharge.htm
  3. https://www.cdc.gov/fungal/diseases/candidiasis/genital/index.html

     

  4. https://www.womenshealth.gov/a-z-topics/bacterial-vaginosis
  5. https://www.nichd.nih.gov/health/topics/bacterialvag/conditioninfo/Pages/faqs.aspx
  6. https://www.nichd.nih.gov/health/topics/bacterialvag/conditioninfo/Pages/cure.aspx
  7. https://www.cdc.gov/std/tg2015/bv.htm
  8. Survey results from “Do You Really Know What’s Causing Your Discharge?” (online survey conducted by HealthyWomen and Symbiomix Therapeutics, LLC, in the first quarter of 2017). Results on file with HealthyWomen and Symbiomix Therapeutics, LLC. 2017.
  9. https://www.cdc.gov/std/bv/treatment.htm
  10. http://www.aafp.org/afp/1998/0315/p1285.html
  11. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17633390

     

  12. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24299970
  13. Bartley JB, Ferris DG, Allmond LM, et al. Personal digital assistants used to document compliance of bacterial vaginosis treatment. 2004;31(8):488-491. https://insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=15273582. Accessed July 2017.
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How Is Bacterial Vaginosis Treated?

11/08/2017 jleff 0

If you have a thin, milky vaginal discharge that’s white or gray, has a fishy odor and causes pain, itching or burning in the vagina, don’t rush to the drugstore to buy an over-the-counter treatment for a yeast infection. These are more likely symptoms of bacterial vaginosis (BV), a common vaginal infection that needs to be diagnosed by your health care professional.

Most women will experience a vaginal infection with discharge, odor and itching at some time in their life, but the symptoms and the treatment vary, depending on the type of infection. That’s why it’s important to be evaluated by your health care provider as soon as symptoms appear.

Your health care provider will likely conduct a physical examination, ask questions about your personal life and medical history and may send samples to the lab for testing.

The three main causes of vaginal discharge are BV, trichomoniasis and vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC), often referred to as a “yeast infection.” Though these may produce some similar symptoms, there are differences—and they are treated differently.

For example, the discharge from VVC looks sort of like cottage cheese, while the discharge with trichomoniasis is yellowish-green. However, even a health care professional will not rely on sight alone to make a diagnosis and prescribe treatment.

Many women don’t seek medical help for vaginal symptoms. They wait for them to go away or try to self-diagnose their problem. A recent online survey of 1,969 women, conducted by HealthyWomen in partnership with Symbiomix Therapeutics, shows that only four out of 10 women visited their health care professional when they experienced abnormal vaginal discharge. The others sought advice from family, friends or the Internet; used an over-the-counter, natural or home remedy; or just waited for the symptoms to subside.

While some BV infections will resolve on their own, most do not. They can be successfully treated with prescription medications, but, if left untreated, BV can worsen, spread and increase the risk of sexually transmitted infections including HIV, as well as pelvic inflammatory disease, which may lead to infertility.

That’s why it’s important to get evaluated by a health care professional and seek treatment if you suffer from any of the following symptoms:

  • A thin white or gray milky discharge

  • A fishy odor

  • Pain, itching or burning in the vagina

  • Itching around the vagina

BV is usually curable using prescription antibiotics. These antibiotics may be oral or topical (inserted into the vagina with an applicator). All antibiotics have potential side effects, sometimes serious, so talk to your health care provider about your prescription and read labels carefully to be aware of any potential side effects.

Be sure to take antibiotics for the fully prescribed time. The most common BV prescriptions are for either five days for the vaginal creams or seven days for the oral medications. Many of the prescription treatments advise that women not drink any alcohol while taking the medication.

Because vaginal treatments can be messy and interfere with sex and oral treatments have other restrictions and side effects, some women indicate they’d prefer a different treatment. In the recent online survey about BV, nearly 9 of 10 women (88%) said they’d be interested in an oral BV medication that they would only have to take once.

With existing options, women often don’t take the full course of antibiotic treatment. Common reasons they stop include: side effects of the treatment; their symptoms disappear; or they don’t want to abstain from alcohol. If a woman does not complete the full course of treatment, it increases the likelihood of the infection returning.

Studies show there is no need to treat male sexual partners for BV, but if you have a female sexual partner, she should seek treatment if you have a BV infection.

Some evidence indicates that probiotics may help prevent and treat BV, but more research is needed.

If you suspect you may have BV, see your health care provider for a diagnosis and to discuss treatment options.

This resource was developed with the support of Symbiomix Therapeutics, LLC.

References

  1. https://www.cdc.gov/std/bv/stdfact-bacterial-vaginosis.htm
  2. https://www.cdc.gov/std/treatment/2010/vaginal-discharge.htm
  3. https://www.cdc.gov/fungal/diseases/candidiasis/genital/index.html

     

  4. https://www.womenshealth.gov/a-z-topics/bacterial-vaginosis
  5. https://www.nichd.nih.gov/health/topics/bacterialvag/conditioninfo/Pages/faqs.aspx
  6. https://www.nichd.nih.gov/health/topics/bacterialvag/conditioninfo/Pages/cure.aspx
  7. https://www.cdc.gov/std/tg2015/bv.htm
  8. Survey results from “Do You Really Know What’s Causing Your Discharge?” (online survey conducted by HealthyWomen and Symbiomix Therapeutics, LLC, in the first quarter of 2017). Results on file with HealthyWomen and Symbiomix Therapeutics, LLC. 2017.
  9. https://www.cdc.gov/std/bv/treatment.htm
  10. http://www.aafp.org/afp/1998/0315/p1285.html
  11. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17633390

     

  12. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24299970
  13. Bartley JB, Ferris DG, Allmond LM, et al. Personal digital assistants used to document compliance of bacterial vaginosis treatment. 2004;31(8):488-491. https://insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=15273582. Accessed July 2017.
Expert Author: 
Short Description: 
Explore all of your bacterial vaginosis treatment options and learn how to get rid of BV.
field_vote: 
Select ratingGive How Is Bacterial Vaginosis Treated? 1/5Give How Is Bacterial Vaginosis Treated? 2/5Give How Is Bacterial Vaginosis Treated? 3/5Give How Is Bacterial Vaginosis Treated? 4/5Give How Is Bacterial Vaginosis Treated? 5/5
Long Description: 
Explore all of your bacterial vaginosis treatment options and learn how to get rid of BV.
Expert Reviewer: 

Viagra prescriptions on NHS triple in 10 years as stigma fades

11/08/2017 Sarah Marsh 0

Doctors warn of dangers of buying erectile dysfunction drugs online after £17m of unlicensed and counterfeit Viagra seized in year

The number of prescriptions for Viagra and other erectile dysfunction drugs has nearly tripled in the last decade as they become cheaper and carry less stigma.

Figures from NHS Digital show there were 2,958,199 prescriptions for sildenafil in 2016, compared to 1,042,431 in 2006. Prescription numbers rose by 43% between 2014 and 2015, and by 16% between 2015 and 2016.

Related: Eating disorders in men rise by 70% in NHS figures

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