The Guardian view on migration: evidence trumps prejudice | Editorial

The instincts that drove Theresa May at the home office are no guide to the best border policy for Brexit Britain

The volume of immigration is a measure of a country’s attractiveness to foreigners. It follows that a political strategy of reducing net migration involves making the UK less appealing as a place to live and work. A strict border regime can impede the daily flow, but it also contributes to a culture of insularity that discourages outsiders from wanting to get in. A more efficient way to achieve the same goal is economic failure. Net migration to the UK rose through the boom at the turn of the century and fell back in the recession that followed the financial crisis. It rose again during the recovery, partly because UK growth outperformed a stagnating eurozone.

According to the latest ONS figures, net migration has fallen to its lowest level in three years – 246,000 in March; down 81,000 from the previous year. There will be many causes to that fall, but it is not irrelevant that it coincides with a period in which British output has looked anaemic relative to continental neighbours. A more direct impact is the departure of EU nationals, driven by uncertainty about their status after Brexit.

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This post was syndicated from Health | The Guardian. Click here to read the full text on the original website.

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The Guardian view on migration: evidence trumps prejudice | Editorial

The instincts that drove Theresa May at the home office are no guide to the best border policy for Brexit Britain

The volume of immigration is a measure of a country’s attractiveness to foreigners. It follows that a political strategy of reducing net migration involves making the UK less appealing as a place to live and work. A strict border regime can impede the daily flow, but it also contributes to a culture of insularity that discourages outsiders from wanting to get in. A more efficient way to achieve the same goal is economic failure. Net migration to the UK rose through the boom at the turn of the century and fell back in the recession that followed the financial crisis. It rose again during the recovery, partly because UK growth outperformed a stagnating eurozone.

According to the latest ONS figures, net migration has fallen to its lowest level in three years – 246,000 in March; down 81,000 from the previous year. There will be many causes to that fall, but it is not irrelevant that it coincides with a period in which British output has looked anaemic relative to continental neighbours. A more direct impact is the departure of EU nationals, driven by uncertainty about their status after Brexit.

Continue reading…

This post was syndicated from Health | The Guardian. Click here to read the full text on the original website.

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply